History

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The Story of June Shelton and Evaluation Center by June Ford Shelton, Ph.D.

I was packing books and personal belongings in my car to move home to Denton on March 31, 1976, when I was first approached about what would become the June Shelton School. Larry and Suzy Beeman, parents of a student at Dean Learning Center, from which I had just resigned, told me that they and a group of learning different children wanted me to stay in Dallas. Would I be willing to pursue the idea of creating a new school in Dallas for children who needed special learning techniques?

I was willing to talk about it.

A meeting was arranged for the next day to outline the philosophy of the school, determine populations to be served, and discuss services the school might offer. On April 2, 1976, Larry Beeman flew the incorporation papers to Austin, “walked them through” and the June Shelton School and Evaluation Center was chartered under the Texas Non-Profit Corporation Act. Its purposes were educational, charitable and scientific: to provide evaluation, education and training for persons with learning disabilities or problems in school, and to instruct educators and other interested persons in understanding language disorders and school problems. Larry Beeman, Georgia Green, and I were the original incorporators. Mr. Beeman was the Chairman of the Board of Trustees, and would serve until 1979.

Beeman and Green began surveying parents; the response was excellent. Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Ablon offered their home for the first forum, and more than 50 people attended. I explained the plans and the possibilities, then Beeman fielded questions, outlined problems to be solved and led the lively discussion.

Three tasks needed immediate attention: 1) add more working board members, 2) decide what to do first, and 3) find a place to begin work. Arnold Ablon and Julia Patrick were duly elected trustees that night, and we decided to open the Evaluation Center on May 1. Allyn Patrick and Beeman arranged for the use of three offices at 3960 North Central Expressway rent-free for three months, made possible by the First National Bank of Dallas. This enabled us to work within our budget, which at that time was zero.

Now we were ready for the hard part. Merco Manufacturing Company made a $10,000 line of credit available to the school that would be used to buy school furniture and equipment. I donated my services for the summer so that the income the school had could be used for office and testing staff salaries. Some of the prospective students’ mothers helped make materials for the school which was to open on Labor Day. An open house hosted by the Beemans brought still more community interest.

Parents with prospective students began applying for admission for their children, showing their confidence that the school, which existed only in the imaginations of a few, would become a reality.

After a three-month search by everyone involved, Carole Ablon located space the school could share with the Church of Religious Science at 6318 Willow Lane. The equivalent of seven rooms seemed ample for a beginning. Carole Kinsala, who had also left the Dean Learning Center, was indispensable: She acted as office manager, administrative assistant and jack-of-all-trades.

We moved into the new quarters on August 11th; by that time 22 students had enrolled. On Labor Day, 48 students showed up, 26 of them unregistered. The new total was a welcome surprise, but one that required many adjustments.

Susan Blanchard was director of the school and the first-grade teacher. Gwen Jensen, and Marilyn Aaron, two of the other original employees, are still with the school.

The inconvenience of ordering desks late and making do until they were delivered seemed like fun to the children, and the experienced teachers took the obstacles in stride. But by March the school was bursting at the seams as the number of students climbed to 66.

Joy Crouch, a friend of the school who later became administrative assistant, located space at the Preston Forest Baptist Church at the corner of Forest and Cromwell. The educational building, a second small building for testing, an office and two small classrooms were available. The move was made over spring break with the help of the parents, teachers, and board members. Moveable dividers were built to help “carve out” classrooms in the large undivided areas. The enclosed areas looked like classrooms, but the dividers didn’t buffer sound. The teachers vowed that if the school ever got real walls they would never complain again. Despite the conditions, though, the teaching was great; the students were learning and their self-esteem and spirits were growing.

When the first year was over, we realized that we had a real school with school spirit and loyalty. The faculty had shared hopes, fears, trials, and triumphs. We had been told that we could never do it, but we were on our way. The school was solvent, and the $10,000 loan had been paid back. The parents and board members were supportive; everyone felt the glow of success.

When the 1977-‘78 school year began, the school had 112 students and 31 staff and faculty members. The original five-member board had grown to seven. We had gained some new teachers and lost a few of the less hardy. That was the year Beverly Dooley came to the school to develop an English curriculum, teach Alphabetic-Phonics and train other teachers. The school had started in 1976 with preschool through sixth grade, but with the addition and influence of Beverly Dooley and Sandi O’Connor, we now added the seventh and eighth grades.

The teachers spent a lot of time preparing the first eighth-grade class for the transition to high school. We also added outdoor intramural sports, emphasizing development of motor skills fitness and endurance. The teachers spent many hours outside the classroom on teacher development and improving the curriculum. Fifteen teachers (from our school and others in the city) were trained in Alphabetic-Phonics in the teacher-training center. Through the training center and the Evaluation Center, the school provided services to the community that reached beyond the students enrolled there.

During the 1978-‘79 school year, the Board of Trustees was expanded to 16. Sherrye Camp came to the school for an interview to do “just a little bit of testing” and was hired as school director, even though she was days away from delivering a baby.

One hundred and nineteen bright, energetic youngsters began that school year with lots of optimism and enthusiasm. As the programs and curriculum improved and expanded, the need for space grew, too, and Camp had her first big challenge. She met it by securing space in the small educational building of the Midway Baptist Church for the preschool, primary, and two first grade classes. Splitting up the school allowed for a more comfortable environment and easier programming, but the teachers missed the stimulating interaction they had previously enjoyed. All agreed that a united campus would be a goal for the future.

The school began having an open house with teacher demonstrations that year, now an annual event. The Parents’ Club organized and took on the task of presenting school and community experts to speak or lead group discussions on learning disabilities, treatment, and future school opportunities to groups of interested parents. The teachers also were very busy that year moving furniture to accommodate the needs of the church. They yearned for the day when the school would no longer have to fade into the woodwork before weekends, holidays and weddings.

The emphasis, as usual, was on the teaching and the emotional growth of the children. Camp, with her background in psychology and special education, introduced “staffing” of the children, a new method to evaluate their progress whereby all of a student’s teachers meet in a group to evaluate his or her progress – in math, history and every other subject, as well as social skills and adjustment to the various classes. Camp’s superior communication skills also were evident in improving student interaction, in communication with the parents and in staff meetings. The faculty became closer and communicated even more under her leadership, and the students seemed happier as a result. That year taught us that structure in recreation and creative activities is at least as important – if not more as it is in academics.

The 1979-‘80 school year opened with 111 students and 30 staff members on two campuses. The second Chairman of the Board was Mr. Charles Burford, who would serve through 1981. That year was the first time the school staff lost a member through death. An irreplaceable aide, Adele Wolf, died of cancer. No one at school knew of her illness. One Monday morning, she failed to come to school. In memory of her unswerving dedication, perseverance and unselfishness, the researchers established an annual award for the student who gives 100 percent in leadership, sportsmanship and citizenship.

In late spring, some unexpected news forced us to speed up our schedule for getting a school with “real walls” and no need to disappear on weekends. Preston Forest Baptist Church was sold to Korean Baptist Church, and the new owners planned to use all the space that we had shared. We needed to move by September, a feat that required much scampering on the part of the administrators and board members. For the teachers and students, meanwhile, it was business as usual.

The search for a site for the school was long and discouraging. Most places we found were unsuitable, but eventually Dick Hestwood found some commercial space in a strip shopping center on Skillman, just two blocks from Garland City limits. It wasn’t ideal but there was ample space and the owners would finish it to our specifications. A three-year lease was required. The yearly rental fee was about seven times as much as we had ever paid before. Time was running out. Parents and teachers were invited to meet at the shopping center to walk through and view the empty, dark space. A lively discussion ensued, and we finally agreed that we would all work together to make it possible. That was the first time the school needed contributions above the income the school and Evaluation Center generated. Board members immediately began to hammer out details of the lease and the construction. Parents, students and teachers planned and carried out the move, but not until after summer school was over.

In 1980 –‘81, 85 students settled into their new school. They had been so much a part of the move that they seemed to feel even more loyal than ever. It was a good year, but there were many hard tasks to accomplish.

We approached the Meadows Foundation to ask for help uncovering our deficit. Instead, they granted the school $50,000 as seed money to establish a development office so that we could learn how to raise the money while we also learned how to become better known in the community for the services we provide.

Unexpectedly, during the spring of that year representatives of the school were asked to appear before the City Council to answer questions about the suitability of our having a school in a shopping center. The council sent us to the Zoning Commission, which concluded that we had one year in which to find another site, as the occupancy permit would not be renewed. That “inspirational” experience renewed our energies and intentions. The Board of Trustees decided that we would have to find new quarters for the following school year instead - then about three months off.

David Martineau and Charles Burford emerged as leaders in the search. For a time, the search was discouraging, but finally the “ideal building” was located, the old Lovers Lane Methodist Church on Lovers Lane. To really know how ideal it was required much vision and imagination. But to Martineau, Burford and me, it looked great. With three and one-quarter acres of land, 60,000 square feet of space and a central location, it fit the needs outlined in our ten-year plan. On the negative side, it was in wretched condition – problems with the heating system and undetected problems with the cooling system, holes in the walls, in need of paint and other minor repairs. But the rooms in the main building were large and had thick walls that kept the sounds inside the classroom. There were two stories, a natural separation for the older and younger students. The former chapel was made-to-order for a preschool, and there was space for a future motor-training room, dining room, sports floor, a stage and more. We saw its potential, and we wanted it. One problem remained – how much would it cost and where would that money come from? Martineau, Burford and John Sterling investigated the price, the terms and the legal details.

Their research revealed that the non-negotiable price was $1.1 million, and $100,000 more would be needed to make the building usable. The zoning was right for our school, but the $75,000 contingency fund was barely adequate for the closing costs. Jim Smith, father of former students James and Campbell, began the repairs on barely a moment’s notice. Without him, all would have been lost. He even found someone to donate all the carpeting. Although the opening date was delayed a few days, everything was moved in and in place for the 97 students who began that 1981-’82 school year. Only the courage and loyalty of the group of board members made it possible for the June Shelton School to have a permanent home at last. This was the biggest step we had ever taken, and, frankly, most of us were scared. However, throughout all this, the Board was led by Mr. David Martineau, who continued his chairmanship through 1983 and who currently (2006) remains a loyal board member.

Although no one looked forward to the hard work of moving again, the teachers were elated with the building and the prospect of never having to move again. The children had fun exploring and getting acquainted with the new school. It seemed to us that we would never be short of space again, a short-lived notion. Ninety-seven students began the 1981-‘82 school year.

The Parents’ Council was established that year with its president serving as non-voting representative on the Board of Trustees. Sharon Jeffries joined the staff as development director, responsible for getting our building paid for and the renovations and improvements made. Board emphasis that year was on fundraising, and our goal was $2.7 million in a three-phase plan. Although only $500,000 was raised that year, some of the needs listed in the plan were satisfied in small, but not unnoticed, ways. Before the school year was over, gifts in-kind and efforts by parents, board members and other friends had satisfied another million dollars’ worth of improvements.

At first, we rattled around in our new building, but soon we began to expand to fill the available space. The children blossomed in our permanent home, and some of the teachers who had small children asked for and received space for a nursery.

The 1982-‘83 school year started with an enrollment of 109 and staff of 33. Our first annual Grandparents’ Day was held, with the grandparents invited for lunch with a visit and demonstration in their grandchild’s classroom. The children whose grandparents could not attend were allowed to invite another favorite adult friend.

Under Sherrye Camp’s direction, the school has become more “structured” each year. The procedure, rules, customs and responsibilities are clearer and thus become automatic – a matter of habit. Operation of the school is smoother, and the children’s study habits have improved. The emphasis on study skills has really paid off, thanks to the influence of Beverly Dooley. A new emphasis is being put on social skills, and the curriculum is more formalized. Teaching the children why certain behaviors are useful, acceptable or appropriate is stressed, and the students learn to understand the effects of their behavior on others and practical ways of getting better responses from others.

During that year, an Athletic Association was formed by the Special Schools (a Dallas association of schools for learning-disabled children) to allow and encourage sports, competition and emphasize fair play and good sportsmanship.

The 1983-‘84 school year began with an enrollment of 127. The Board of Trustees increased in number to 24; the chairman was Mr. Pete Winstead. Board members Don Houseman and Peggy Gottsacker led the annual fundraising campaign, raising over $100,000.

The 1984-‘85 school year began with 138 students on board. The Board chairman was Mr. Jim Wood. We also welcomed a new development director, Bob Hopkins. He directed the annual support campaign, the capital improvement campaign and public relations efforts.

The spring of 1985 was very exciting as we realized that our dream of establishing a multipurpose activity center might become a reality. Mark Bramlett’s father, James Bramlett, offered to coordinate and contract the construction of a center so it could be available for 1985-‘86 school year, Mark’s last year at Shelton. After careful consideration, the Board of Trustees decided to accept his offer and enter into a fund- raising campaign to try to raise $1.2 million. The money would pay for construction and renovation of the multipurpose activity center, additional classrooms, debt retirement, a business office, preschool classrooms and office space for Sherrye Camp’s secretary. As in 1982, when we fell short of our lofty fundraising goals and efforts by the board, the school and the parent group helped us accomplish an additional million dollars’ worth of improvements. 0ur progress toward the current goals is quite impressive, and all those who have played a role in this effort should be proud.

Dr. Jean Kennerly joined the staff in 1985 to replace me as director of the Evaluation Center. I will continue to do some evaluations, but Dr. Kennerly will be doing most of them and will handle all administrative duties for the Evaluation Center.

I announced my intentions to pass my administrative duties as executive director to Sherrye Camp beginning in the summer of 1985. The Board of Trustees accepted my resignation and gave me the title of Executive Director Emeritus. I will remain relatively active in board affairs and will serve as an advisor to anyone who will listen on the staff, faculty or board.

The 1985-‘86 school year began with almost 200 students and 50 staff members. Mr. Bernie Kraft was the Board Chairman. Carole Hill, who will also serve as its director, started an Early Childhood Development program. The Board of Trustees increased its number to 29. An appreciation dinner was planned at the Dallas Country Club for October 3, followed by a student reunion October 4 in the Activities Center.

So much has been accomplished in the last nine years, thanks to the board members, hundreds of parents, teachers, administrators, community leaders – and especially those students for whom this school was built.

Shelton also divided its school population into two schools during the 1985-86 school year. The lower school included primer through fourth grade, and the middle school included fifth through eighth grade.

The 1986-‘87 school year started with an enrollment of 230 students and a staff of 55. The Board Chairman was Mr. Doug Lattner, who served until 1988. This was the year Early Childhood, lower, middle and upper school divisions were made to better serve the need of our growing enrollment. The Early Childhood program served both preschool and kindergarten students and was led by Carole Hill. The lower school included children in kindergarten through third grade and was led by Alice Scarborough. The middle school, led by Carol Utay, consisted of fourth through sixth grade students; the upper school, seventh through eighth grade students. The upper school, seventh through eighth grade, began the year under the leadership of Beverly Dooley. By the middle of the year, Sherrye realized Beverly’s talents in the area of teacher training were needed throughout the entire school. At that time, Lynn Nolen took over the duties of head of upper school, and Mrs. Dooley devoted her time to training teachers throughout the nation as well as the Shelton staff. Sandi O’ Connor and Nancy Reddington were also active in training teachers and parents. Understanding the unique need of students who learn differently was important to teachers and parents alike.

Before the 1986-‘87 year began, the middle school wing was added to accommodate Shelton’s growing enrollment. An upstairs addition to “Fellowship Hall” gave our logical fourth, fifth and sixth graders an opportunity to discover why their second floor classrooms were numbered in the three hundreds. A preschool/lower school playground was added to our “front yard” to strengthen the large motor muscles of our younger population.

In 1987-‘88 a portable building was added to our “back yard” and Sandi O’Connor and Debbie Pitman moved out back to educate the ninth grade. This addition of ninth grade had long been a request of concerned parents who wanted their children to transition smoothly into high school.

The student population during this year was at its highest level. Two hundred and fifty students were enrolled in preschool through ninth grade with 70 staff members.

In 1988-‘89, the student enrollment remained at 250 with 71 staff members. This was the year the Dallas economy hit rock bottom. The Board of Trustees Chairman was Ric Middlekauff. The Parent Council remained strong and donated funds to begin a computer lab. During the year, other funds were secured from various grants that were written by our new development director, Diann Slaton, and the computer lab continued to grow.

The quality educational programs have remained strong with additional computer equipment and the latest technology to serve the need of learning different students. The lower school added an afternoon reading lab so that students would not only learn the decoding process in the morning class, but also practice comprehension skills in the afternoon. Project Wild, Project Heroes and Project Charlie are three other curricula added this year to enable our students to become more aware of their environment, themselves, their unique learning styles, their potential for success as adults, and their ability to make mature decisions based on facts.

Meeting the needs of the student who learns differently means staying in touch with current programs and technologies that allow each learner to reach his/her highest educational potential. Shelton School strives to help each learner discover how he/she learns best and how to be able to return to an educational environment that best suits his/her learning style.

In the spring of 1989, Sherrye Camp, Executive Director, announced her resignation, effective June 1989. She was marrying Kenneth Banks and moving to Schulenberg, Texas. The Board of Trustees hired the firm of Ward, Howell International to assist the school in seeking a new Executive Director. Given the lateness of the year, the board discussed whether or not it was feasible/possible to find a permanent director. With the assistance of Linc Eldredge, Consultant (Ward, Howell International) the board interviewed a series of permanent director candidates as well as Dick Cadigan, an individual who indicated willingness to be Interim Head of Shelton for 1989-‘90.

In July 1990, the board unanimously voted to offer the position of Interim Head to Dick Cadigan and to commence a nationwide search for a permanent Executive Director for 1990-91. Given the strong current academic leadership of the school under division heads Betty Glasheen (lower school) – pre-kindergarten to grade three); Alice Scarborough (grade four to grade six) and Lynn Nolen (upper school – grade seven to grade nine), the board felt confident that Dick Cadigan could manage the school on an interim basis. His background included extensive educational administrative experience, work in financial and people management, and a good understanding of people of all ages.

Enrollment stood at 204 on opening day with a projected deficit of $30,000. The Board had sufficient contingency funds to cover the deficit if it remained at the end of the year. However, in March 1990 enrollment stood at 215 and there was a projected fund balance of $25,000. The new Board of Trustees Chairman was Mr. James (Boots) Reeder, who led the Board until 1995, and continues as a board member to this day (2006).

The Parent Council experimented with a new format for its annual spring fundraiser and realized over $50,000 from its Spring Fling, which attracted over 400 Shelton parents and friends.

In February 1990 the Shelton School Search Committee recommended to the Board of Trustees that Joyce Pickering of Louisville, Kentucky be appointed permanent Executive Director.

The trustees unanimously accepted the recommendation and Mrs. Pickering accepted. She had extensive experience in curriculum, administration, teaching and research in the field of “learning differences.”

Shelton’s History Continues by Joyce S. Pickering, Hum.D., Jessica Newman, Theresa M. Ball, and Anne Thomas

In July 1990, Joyce S. Pickering was named Executive Director, CEO, Head of School, and Board President of Shelton School.

Enrollment began at 175, and by the end of the year rose to 181 students. The Annual Giving Campaign was co-chaired by Steve Crowell and Rick Porter. The campaign’s goal was $125,000. Vicki Mosely was named the Parents’ Council President. The auction party’s theme was “Shelton Express” and the net proceeds were $65,000. The Auction was co-chaired by Cindy Ward and Kathy Kincheloe. The Dads’ Club was formed this year, and was an exciting new addition to Shelton. Carl Urban was named the first President, and the Dads’ Club held its first annual cook out on Memorial Day for the whole school.

Shelton continued to grow this year. The Language and Speech Clinic and the Evaluation Center moved out of a house on Caillet to the first floor of the main building. The computer lab also moved into a larger room. Bob Pickering and the Board’s Building and Grounds Committee studied the school’s plan. In December 1990, Shelton received accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). In spring 1991, Shelton also began to focus on Outreach Programs, via speakers, presentations, and trainings. In January 1991, the Saturday Scholars Program began with 14 students as a major offering of Shelton’s Outreach.


1991 - 1992

1991-1992 was a very busy year at Shelton. Enrollment began at 170 and grew to 181 by the end of the school year. The Annual Giving Campaign goal was $125,000 and was co-chaired by Dr. Paul Neubach and Susan Eldredge. “Reach for the Stars” was the theme for the auction party. The net proceeds were $60,000 and was co-chaired by Diane Wallace and her father, Cloyde Pinson. The Dads’ Club President this year was Carl Urban. In the summer of 1991, Shelton applied to the Southern Association of Independent Schools (SAIS) for accreditation and it was granted.

Expansion continued in 1991-1992. The Early Childhood Program for preschool through kindergarten (ages three to six) was reinstated. The first Capital Campaign began in November 1991, with a goal of three million dollars. The campaign was co-chaired by James (Boots) Reeder, Kenneth Hughes, and John Rauscher. The goals were to buy additional land around the school, build a new wing, build a sports field, and to add a porte-cochere at the west end of the building. One of these goals was recognized early with the purchase of 1.5 acres of land for the sports field on the west end of the school facing Lovers Lane. The groundbreaking ceremony for the field was held in the spring of 1992.

In 1991, additions were made to Shelton’s programs and staff. The Choices Program was added to the daily curriculum. Auditory Discrimination and Memory curriculum was added to Language Therapy classes. In addition, three new coaches were added for sports. The first use of the title “The Horizon” for the school newsletter was added in March and April 1992.


1992 - 1993

The 1992-1993 school year opened with 217 students and closed with 241 students. The Annual Campaign goal was $125,000 and was co-chaired by George O’Reilly and Linda Kasmir. Lou Cagle was the Parents’ Council President. The auction party’s theme was “Shelton Stampede” and net proceeds were $62,000. The party was co-chaired by Vivienne Neubach and Ann Burbridge. The now famous Dixie Chicks provided the evening entertainment. The Dads’ Club President was Carl Urban. The ninth grade was offered for the first time this school year. Shelton School students who wished to remain one more year before transitioning to other public schools could now do so.

Enrollment continued to increase in the 1993-1994 school year. Beginning enrollment was 257 and swelled to 282 by the end of the year. J.P. Pierce and Sharon Jobe co-chaired the Annual Campaign. The goal was $135,000. Vivienne Neubach took over as Parents’ Council President and Suki Jarzemsky, Clyde Payne, and Mary Young co-chaired the Shelton auction party, the “Shelton Sh-boom.” The net proceeds reached $60,000.00. Paul Neubach, M.D. was the Dads’ Club President.

In December 1993, discussions occurred about new building goals. The goals were six-fold:

  • Build a new wing with six classrooms (eventually called the Hillcrest Education Wing.) Groundbreaking for the new wing was in April 1994.
  • Create an Art Center (Penson/Jarzemsky Fine Arts Center)
  • Create Library Media Center (William C. Ward Library Media Center)
  • Remodel the science lab and other spaces in the building
  • Build new parking lot, fences, and new gates

Dr. Susan Fleming became the Director of the Evaluation Center. In the summer of 1993, the first Montessori Applied to Children at Risk (MACAR) workshop was held, with 13 people participating. In the fall of 1993, the administration offices, Language/Speech Hearing Clinic, and Evaluation Center moved to the building across the street on the corner of Caillet and Lovers Lane.


1994 - 1995

The 1994-1995 school year saw enrollment beginning at 310 and ending at 335. A waiting list was started for admissions in for the 1995-1996 school year. In June 1994, Joy Martello began as the first Coordinator of Outreach Programs. Pam Waldron was the President of the Parents’ Council and Vivienne Neubach and Win Padgett co-chaired the Annual Giving campaign. The goal was $150,000. “Shelton Swings” was the auction party theme and net proceeds were $68,000. The party was co-chaired by Suki Jarzemsky and Janice Ryan. The Dads’ Club continued its Memorial Day cookout, and was led by President J.P. Pierce. In November 1994, a letter was mailed to parents to gauge interest in starting a high school. A feasibility study for a Shelton high school was planned. Dr. Hoyt Watson of the University of North Texas completed the study in May 1995. The study indicated the following:

  • Possibility of an addition of grades 10, 11, and12
  • Recommended grades 7-12 be housed in a new facility in North Dallas
  • One grade added per year
  • $4,600,000 to $5,000,000 necessary to open a high school
  • $3,000,000 needs to be raised before program viable

Enrollment began at 332 and ended at 344 in the 1995-1996 school year, with a waiting list for admissions. Ninety-three staff members were employed. The chairmanship of the Board became Mr. William C. Ward, who served in that capacity until 2002. The Annual Giving goal was $160,000 and was co-chaired by Mary Young and Jim Hodges. The Annual Giving amounts increased from $106,517 in 1990 to $158,128 in 1995-1996. The Parents’ Council President was Suki Jarzemsky. The auction party was chaired by Debby Webb and Anne Smith. The theme was “Feast de Renaissance” and net proceeds were $69,000. This was the first year grandparents had their own section in the silent auction and the first year to offer a raffle for tuition. John Crank was the Dads’ Club President. Five-year re-accreditation was received from SACS.

The Midway Baptist Church was purchased, and the campus was named The Swift Campus in honor of Tom and Dottie Swift and their children, Chauncey and Tom Swift IV. The plan included moving Early Childhood through fourth grade to that location, with grades five through nine remaining at the Lovers Lane location. It was hoped to open that site in the fall of 1996. A year was needed for the rezoning of the Midway property and for renovations of the site and buildings at the Swift Campus. April 2, 1996 brought the 20th year anniversary of the school’s incorporation. Also in April 1996, a retreat was held to plan a high school and the Upper School staff was announced.

Prior to1995-1996, the benefits package for employees was a $2000 life insurance policy and a retirement plan without employer contribution. In 1995-96, the life insurance policy was changed to $10,000 and the school began a retirement plan contribution of a match of $300.00.


1996 - 1997

The 1996-1997 school year saw enrollment begin at 391 and swelled to 408 by the end of the year. The Annual Giving goal was $180,000 and was co-chaired by Bob and Pat Walker and Janice Ryan. “Shelton’s Beach Bash” was the auction party theme, and the party was co-chaired by Pam Dealey and Susan Nahkunst. Net proceeds reached $59,000. Mary Young was the Parents’ Council President, and Steve Manchester was the Dads’ Club President. The summer of 1996 saw the first high school courses offered at Shelton during summer school. Ninth grade had 20 students, and the tenth grade was offered for the first time.

The Lower School moved in August 1996 to the Swift Campus on Midway Road. The first day of school for 1996-1997 occurred at two locations. The dedication of the Lower School Swift Campus took place October 7, 1996. Shelton’s technology continued to grow with the addition of a web site and email capability.

The silent phase began of the third Capital Campaign. The goal to build a high school was set in 1996-1997. In the summer of 1996, the school logo transitioned from a child reading a book to the Shelton shield with the book, ribbon, and three stars.


1997 - 1998

Enrollment began at 443 and ended at 469 in the 1997-1998 school year. Cathy Bruff and Max and Sharon Gardner co-chaired the Annual Giving Campaign with a goal of $200,000. The name of the Parents’ Council was changed to the Parents’ Association. It was led by Janice Ryan. The auction party was co-chaired by Pam Dealey, Susan Nahkunst, and Marilyn Weber. The theme was “Beach Bash,” and the net proceeds were $93,000. The Dads’ Club President was Robert Walker. The fall of 1997 saw negotiations begin for the purchase of the Prestonwood Baptist Church property, on the corner of Hillcrest Road and Arapaho in north Dallas. There were also preparations for rezoning the property. The 11th grade was added this year, and Judy Browne was employed as the first Head of the Upper School. The first Upper School homecoming activities and dance took place in the fall of 1997, and the first Upper School Ethics Symposium was held in May 1998. Anne Wagner was hired as the Director of Public Relations. In addition, a new speech facility was added to the Swift Campus. In 1997-1998, major medical plan was added as an option to the benefits package.


1998 - 1999

The 1998-1999 school enrollment began at 522 and ended at 524. $260,000 was the Annual Giving goal and was co-chaired by Kevin and Connie Howe, and Don and Ellen Winspear. Jan Theilen was the President of the Parents’ Council and the auction party was co-chaired by Cherry Chalker, Diann Abadie, and Terri Bennett. The theme of the party was “Shelton Sets Sail” and the net proceeds reached $56,000. Gary Webb was the Dads’ Club President. The 12th annual golf tournament was held. Expansion continued of EC – 11th grade with the addition of the 12th grade. In addition, the acquisition of Prestonwood Baptist Church was finalized and the zoning change was accomplished. In the fall of 1998, a plan for renovation of the campus was announced. In May 1999, grades four through 12 moved to the new Ward Campus location. The dining hall in the new location was used to graduate the first class of four seniors in May 1999. Dr. June Shelton was in attendance and honored at this ceremony. In July 1999, the first summer school was held at the Ward Campus location.


1999 - 2000

Enrollment for the 1999-2000 school year began at 604 students and ended at 630. Co-chairmen Kevin and Connie Howe and Win and Lynn Bell reached an Annual Giving goal of $275,000. Sharon Gardner was the President of the Parents’ Association. “Nuts and Bolts 2000” was the theme of the auction party held in the new Swift Athletic Center. The net proceeds reached $90,817, and was chaired by Terri Bennett. Gary Webb was the President of the Dads’ Club.

Prestonwood Christian Academy (PCA) shared the building with Shelton. PCA was housed on the first and second floors, and Shelton filled the rest of the space. Shelton’s Lower School was still located at the Swift Campus on Midway Road. The Capital Campaign goal was changed from $8.5 million to $7.5 million after renegotiation by James B. Reeder with Prestonwood Baptist Church and an early pay off of the note with the church. Shelton continued to expand in many areas. In the spring of 2000, the Admissions and Development were divided into two separate departments, with Madeline Robison becoming the Director of Development and Diann Slaton remaining as Director of Admissions. Formerly, Diann Slaton headed both departments. In addition, Linda Kneese assumed the position of Director of the Outreach Department. February 2000 saw the first open house held by the Upper School for prospective students. Band was offered for the first time for students in the fourth through eighth grades.

In the spring of 2000, a new student database was put into use. In May 2000 Shelton graduated a class of 22 seniors. A Human Resources Department was added in June 2000. In the summer of 2000, Multisensory Structured Language Education Training Workshops for Teaching and Therapy Level were offered as part of teacher training in the Outreach Department. The courses were accredited by the International Multisensory Structured Language Education Council (IMSLEC).


2000-2001

The 2000-2001 school year started with 687 students and ended with 712. The Annual Giving goal was $400,000 and was co-chaired by Steve and Cindy Manchester and Dennis and Susan Houfek. Marilyn Weber was the President of the Parents’ Association. Carol Blair chaired the auction party, “Under the Big Top,” and net proceeds were $79,735. The Dads’ Club President was John Neely. Shelton remained divided into two facilities, sharing the Ward Campus with PCA. As of October 2000, 199 staff members were employed. The year 2000-01 saw several anniversaries for Shelton. January marked the tenth year of Shelton’s Saturday Scholars Program. Forty students were enrolled in that spring session. In addition, April 2nd was the 25th anniversary of the school’s incorporation. Twenty-one seniors graduated in May 2001.


2001-2002

In the 2001-2002 school year enrollment began at 718 and ended at 729. Steve and Cindy Manchester and Howard and Dana Feldman co-chaired the Annual Giving with a goal of $425, 000. “April in Paris” was the theme of the auction party that netted $135,000. Carol Blair and Patti Emerson were the co-chairs of the auction party. John Neely held the Dads’ Club presidency for a second year. Two hundred and five staff members were employed. PCA continued to occupy the first and second floors of the Ward Campus. PCA’s lease ended in May 2002, and the Academy moved to their new Prestonwood Baptist Church campus. The Capital Campaign of $7.5 million was completed in February 2002. It was announced that the Lower School Campus (EC-2) would move to the Ward Campus in the summer of 2002. The Lower School Swift Campus was put on the market to sell. The Lower School portion of the Ward Campus was named the Swift Child Development Center to honor Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Swift, III. The fifth annual Ethics Symposium was held for the Upper School. In 2001-2002, long-term disability was provided to the employees’ benefit package at no cost to the employee.

The first school-wide Mayfest was held on the Ward Campus. Shelton graduated 25 seniors in May 2002. In June 2001, the accreditation process began with submittal of Adherence to Standards documentation to the Independent Schools Association of the Southwest (ISAS).


2002 - 2003

Enrollment for the 2002-2003 began at 753 and ended at 791. The new eleventh Chairman of the Board of Directors was Mr. Robert Walker. The Annual Giving goal was $425,000 and was co-chaired by Howard and Dana Feldman and David and Barbara Farmer. Anne Smith was the President of the Parents’ Association and the auction party was chaired by Gay Rekerdres. The theme was “Growing Together,” and the net proceeds reached $160,000. Steven Collins was the President of the Dads’ Club.

Swift Campus for grades Early Childhood to third moved to the Ward Campus in June 2002. This school year was the first for all grade levels, Early Childhood through 12th, to be consolidated on one campus. The Swift Campus was sold in September 2002. In the summer 2002, the Shelton Scholars Program enrolled 71 students. The division of grades reconfigured as:

  • Lower School for grades Early Childhood through second
  • Upper Elementary for grades third through fifth
  • Middle School for grades sixth through eighth
  • Upper School for grades ninth through twelfth

The annual spring events of the Upper School Ethics Symposium and the Mayfest continued.


2003 - 2004

The 2003-2004 school year began with an enrollment of 799 and ended with 803. The Annual Giving goal was $445,000, which was surpassed by $39,510. The campaign was co-chaired by David and Barbara Farmer and Don and Deborah Dingwall. The Parents’ Association President was Donell Wiggins and the Dads’ Club President was Robert Shrell. The auction party’s theme was “Night Under the Stars.” Chaired by Marvel Washington, the event netted $193,000. The accreditation process with Independent Schools Association of the Southwest (ISAS) continued with its team site visit in October 2003. The school received accreditation in June 2004. An all-school volunteering effort was done to build a house for Habitat for Humanity, with the home being finished and dedicated in March 2004. In 2003-2004, the employee benefit package includes a $10,000 life insurance policy, a $1000 match in the retirement plan, a 125 plan, major medical, direct deposit, and long term disability. The seventh Upper School Ethics Symposium was held. The third all-school Mayfest was held in May 2004. In March 2004 Joyce Pickering announced that Suzanne Stell was named Assistant Head of School, beginning June 2004. A two-year pilot oral language-learning program was funded by a foundation. The Shelton Early Intervention Language Learning Program was created in two classrooms at the nearby All Saints Catholic Church School. There were 37 seniors who graduated.


2004-2005

The 2004-2005 school year began with an enrollment of 815 and ended with 810. Shelton employed 232 people this school year. In September a Memorial Service was held for the school’s founder, Dr. June Ford Shelton, who has passed away during the summer. The Board of Directors was renamed Board of Trustees, and continued to be led by Mr. Robert Walker. In December 2004 the Board created the June F. Shelton Legacy Foundation, with assets of $5,749,800; this foundation has its separate Board of Trustees. In February 2005, the Landmark Foundation was formed, also having its own Board of Trustees, with real estate assets of $13,288,000. The Annual Giving goal of $470,000 was exceeded with pledges totaling $512,078. The campaign was co-chaired by Don and Deborah Dingwall and Danya Casey. The Parents’ Association President was Barbara Farmer and the Dads’ Club President was Robert Shrell. The auction party’s theme was “Stepping Out for Shelton: A Broadway Revue.” Chaired by Bridget Black, the event netted $148,000. This was the first year that new parents had to attend eight parent programs regarding learning differences and Shelton’s academic programs. The school received a $150,000 grant from Hillcrest Foundation to launch a distance-learning program and offer workshops and courses via the Internet. A lease with Apple Corporation of Texas was finalized wherein in the fall 2005, students in the grades seven through twelve will be issued an Apple iBook (laptop). During the school year, the students will be able to use the laptop during the day and take them home. The laptops will be turned into the school each May. The eighth Upper School Ethics Symposium was held. The fourth all-school Mayfest was held in May 2005. The first year of the two-year pilot oral language-learning program, the Shelton Early Intervention Language Learning Program, was held in two classrooms at the nearby All Saints Catholic Church School. There were 37 seniors who graduated and they were accepted into 56 colleges and universities. Scholarships were offered in the amount of $344,000 to our seniors.


2005 - 2006

The 2005-2006 school year began with an enrollment of 824 and ended with 839. Shelton employed 236 people this school year. The Board of Trustees’ new Chairman was Mr. Phillip Wiggins. The Annual Giving goal of $480,000 was exceeded with pledges for a total of $484,775. The campaign was co-chaired by Don and Deborah Dingwall and Ken and Paula Hughes. The Parents’ Association Co-Presidents were Rhonda Kelbeck and Jan Golden, and the Dads’ Club President was Greg Mazyck. The auction party’s theme was “Shelton Stampede,” featuring singer Jerry Jeff Walker. Co-chaired by Susan Griffiths, Ruth Mitchell and Dee Velvin, the event netted $300,000. This was the second year that new parents had to attend eight parent programs regarding learning differences and Shelton’s academic programs. Since 1994 the Outreach Department has continued to expand its workshop offerings to include: the Association Method; Gesell Developmental Assessment; Montessori Applied to Children At Risk, Multisensory Structured Language Education (MSLE)/Sequential English Education (SEE) Training at Teaching and Therapy Levels; Referral and Testing; Alphabetic Phonics courses; Montessori Elementary Level Training; Montessori Pre-Primary Level Training, and Saturday Seminars. In the fall 2005 the Outreach Department offered its first distance-learning program via the Internet, entitled “Dyslexia and Related Disorders” and in June 2006 “Choices” was launched. Outreach plans to launch a new program in the fall 2006, modeled after the Shelton Scholars program. It will offer evening classes for adults who need assistance in reading, writing, and spelling. In August 2005 the students in the grades seven through twelve were issued an Apple iBook (laptop). During the school year, the students were able to use the laptop during the day and take them home. The laptops will be turned into the school each May. The ninth Upper School Ethics Symposium was held. The fifth all-school Mayfest was held in May 2006. The two-year pilot oral language-learning program, the Shelton Early Intervention Language Learning Program, was in its second year in two classrooms at the nearby All Saints Catholic Church School. There were 44 seniors who graduated, and they were accepted into 77 colleges and universities. Scholarships were offered in the amount of $1,115,860 to our seniors, and they accepted a total of $241,960.


2006 - 2007

The 2006-2007 school year began with an enrollment of 830 and ended with 839, having had a high of 844 in March 2007. Shelton employed 248 people this school year. The Board of Trustees’ Chairman was again Mr. Phillip Wiggins. The school began the procedure of creating preliminary drawings for a 4th floor addition as well as meeting with various community and city officials about achieving approval for a zoning amendment. It is hoped that this approval of plans by the City of Dallas will be received in time to begin construction in the summer of 2007.

Reorganization of the school’s program for 2007-2008 will see restructuring of Lower School to be Early Childhood, Pre-Primary (Transition-first), Primary (first/second grades combined) while the Upper Elementary will have elementary classes (third/fourth combined grade) and fifth grade.

The Annual Giving goal of $500,000 was exceeded with pledges for a total of $639,394. The campaign was co-chaired by Ken and Paula Hughes and Bill and Melanie Rapier. After several years’ lapse, the Development Office sponsored the Shelton Classic Golf Tournament, with proceeds of $40,600.

The Parents’ Association Co-Presidents were Susan Griffiths and Ruth Mitchell, and the Dads’ Club President was Michael Kaplan. The auction party’s theme was “Shelton Stampede,” featuring singer Tracy Byrd. Co-chairs were Amy and Ben Jared, Heather and Tom Clark, and Stephanie and Monty Mueller. The event netted $346,000. The Parents’ Association’s total amount of gifts to the school was $380,000.

This was the third year that new parents were required to attend eight parent programs regarding learning differences and Shelton’s academic programs. Outreach launched a new program, modeled after the Shelton Scholars program. In the fall and spring, it offered evening classes for adults who need assistance in reading, writing, and spelling. The Outreach Center continued offering its on-line courses. The on-line courses included Dyslexia and Related Disorders, and Choices: The Shelton Social Skills Program.

Beginning in August 2005 and continuing each year since, the students in grades seven through twelve are issued an Apple iBook (laptop). During the school year, the students were able to use the laptop during the day and take them home. The laptops are turned into the school each May. The tenth Upper School Ethics Symposium was held. The sixth all-school Mayfest was held in May 2007.

There were 58 seniors who graduated, and they were accepted into 69 colleges and universities. Scholarships were offered in the amount of $1,005,930 to our seniors, and they accepted a total of $284,000.

The school celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2006 -2007 through various means. New mission and vision statements were created to begin the year. They are:

Mission Statement

Shelton

on a mission

a school and resource center dedicated to

~ making a difference ~

by serving and empowering the lives of

~ students who learn differently ~

Because Not All Great Minds Think Alike

The Vision

~ a world model in education ~

of

~ individuals who learn differently ~

through

Education

Evaluation

Therapy

Research

and

Outreach

A new logo was created which was used on print material and letterhead. There was a t-shirt, using the logo, given to staff to wear on specific days (such as the 30th of a month). Throughout the year, all events focused on the anniversary, including open house, development functions, Mayfest and end-of-the year awards assemblies and graduations. Shelton’s anniversary gift to the community was a special series, Gifts of Learning Differences. Guest speakers and panelists highlighted the creativity of the learning different person. The speakers were: Gordon Sherman, Ph.D., Edward Hallowell, M. D., Paul Orfalea, Jerry Pinkney, Sylvia Richardson, M.D., Eric McGehearty, Tomima Edmark, and Randell Holmes. In the fall the students were asked to about What Shelton Means to Me. Their creative writings were bound into three binders and are saved for posterity. A Shelton Calendar was published and sold, using student artwork and some quotes from their writings, What Shelton Means to Me. The staff was asked to write a memory of the 30th anniversary year, and those writing are also bound and will be kept in Shelton’s archives.


2007 - 2008

The 2007-2008 school year began with an enrollment of 834 and ended with 842, having had a high of 846 in December 2007. Shelton employed 260 people this school year. The Board of Trustees’ Chairman was again Mr. Phillip Wiggins.

Reorganization of the school’s program for 2007-2008 was accomplished. Lower School now comprises of Early Childhood, Pre-Primary (Transition-first), Primary (first/second grades combined) while the Upper Elementary includes elementary classes (third/fourth combined grade) and fifth grade. Suzanne Stell, Assistant Head since 2004, was named Head of School, with Joyce Pickering continuing as Executive Director. Betty Glasheen, Head of Lower School and employed at Shelton for 30 years, retired as Head, but transitioned as a part-time employee with the Development Office.

The Annual Giving goal of $525,000 was exceeded with gifts for a total of $543,659. The campaign was co-chaired by Melanie and Bill Rapier and Deb and Tim Pullen. The Development Office sponsored the Second Shelton Classic Golf Tournament, after several years lapse, with proceeds of $37,168.

Meredith Lyon, a Shelton 8th grader, who died in 2005, has the Heart of a Lyon Scholarship named in her honor. This year it was awarded to Andrew Mewing.

Jon Pace, a Shelton graduate, passed away in August 2007. His parents requested that all donations be made in his honor to Shelton School or the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. The Jonathan Pace Scholarship Fund was set up in his honor, and the recipient for 2008 was Michael Grayson.

Nicholas Mentesana, a Shelton 8th grader and football team captain, was killed in a tragic accident in January 2008. Donations in his memory have been placed in an endowed scholarship. His cousin, Anthony Mentesana, a Shelton graduate, presented the first Heart of a Giant Scholarship Award, to Kaity Reaves at the May 2008 Eighth Grade Graduation.

The Parents’ Association Co-Presidents were Barbara Novotny and Karen Carney, and Michael Kaplan completed a second year as Dads’ Club President. The auction party’s theme was “Shelton Stampede” held at Dallas’ House of Blues. Co-chairs were Tanya Mendenhall, Charlotte Anderson, Shea Boscamp, Tami Delsanter, and Tracy Cheatham. Honorary Chairs were Pat and Emmitt Smith. The event netted $559,436. The Parents’ Association’s total amount of gifts to the school was $589,000.

This was the fourth year that new parents were required to attend six parent programs about learning differences and Shelton’s academic programs. The Outreach Center launched a new program, modeled after the Shelton Scholars program. In the fall and spring, it offered evening classes for adults who need assistance in reading, writing, and spelling. The Outreach Center continued offering its on-line courses. Three on-line courses are now offered: Dyslexia and Related Disorders, Choices: The Shelton Social Skills Program, and Shelton System for Organization and Study Skills.

This year, as with each beginning in August 2005, the students in grades seven through twelve were issued an Apple iBook (laptop). During the school year, the students were able to use the laptop during the day and take them home overnight. In May 2008, these iBook laptops were retired because 800 new Macbook laptops are to be furnished to staff and students in the fall 2008. The 11th Upper School Ethics Symposium was held. The seventh all-school Mayfest was held in May 2008.

There were 46 seniors who graduated, and they were accepted into 126 colleges and universities. Scholarships were offered in the amount of $1,102,300 to 15 seniors, and ten seniors accepted a total of $232,700. A new publication was distributed during end-of-the-year awards assemblies and graduations entitled, “Shelton Pride.” This booklet featured not only seniors but all Shelton students’ many awards, honors, monetary donations to outside organizations, and service hours.

Shelton students achieved many awards, including the following notable honors: National Merit Commended Scholar—Laura Podd; World Champion Cheerleader—Whitney Elkins; and Girls’ Tennis Player of the Year for 5A Public and Private Schools—Casey Johnson.

In the summer 2008, the school began interior renovation on the second and third floors on the north end of the building to add six new classrooms.


2008 - 2009

The 2008 - 2009 school year began with an enrollment of 857 and ended with 856, having had a high of 860 in October 2008. Shelton employed 261 people this school year. Mr. Phillip Wiggins continued to be the Board of Trustees’ Chairman.

In the summer 2008, the school began interior renovation on the second and third floors on the north end of the building to add six new classrooms. These renovations were completed in time for the beginning of school that fall and proved to be a great asset for the space needs of our students.

The Annual Giving reached $524,493 in donations. The campaign was co-chaired by Deb and Tim Pullen and Lynn and Win Bell. The Development Office sponsored the Third Shelton Classic Golf Tournament with proceeds of $33,600.

The Parents’ Association Co-Presidents were Barbara Novotny and Diane Byrd, and David Goldstein was Dads’ Club President. The auction party’s theme was “Denim and Diamonds” and was held at the Dallas Sheraton. Co-chairs were Denise Farinholt and Lyn LaMothe. Honorary Chairs were Sara and David Martineau. The event netted $250,000. The Parents’ Association’s total amount of gifts to the school for the year was $275,000.

This was the fifth year that new parents were required to attend six parent programs about learning differences and Shelton’s academic programs. The Outreach Center launched a new program, modeled after the Shelton Scholars program. In the fall and spring, it offered evening classes for adults who need assistance in reading, writing, and spelling. The Outreach Center continued offering its on-line courses. Three on-line courses are now offered: Dyslexia and Related Disorders, Choices: The Shelton Model for Teaching Social Skills and Values, and Shelton System for Organization and Study Skills. Plans are underway for offering the SEE (Sequential English Education) training by webinar.

The Outreach Center also made arrangements to offer training in Multisensory Teaching Approach (MTA) for Keller ISD and training in Take Flight to the school districts of Oxford and Vestavia, Alabama. Shelton Outreach collaborated with the Juvenile Justice System to train teachers to offer SEE in a summer camp. Presentations during the year were made at American Montessori Society in California and New Orleans, Louisiana, at the Mississippi Speech and Language Conference, at the International Dyslexia Association in Seattle, Washington, the International Montessori Conference in Beijing, China, and the ISAS Conference in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

In 2008 – 2009 Shelton also hosted approximately 500 individuals or groups in providing observations and information.

The 12th Upper School Ethics Symposium was held. The eighth Mayfest was held in May 2009. The school hosted the sixth annual Film Festival in April.

This was a year of firsts. The Lasso, a cyber-newsletter, was offered for the first time covering Upper School news. The newsletter operates under the guidelines of the American Society of Newspaper Editors. The Public Relations Department launched its first electronic newsletter, The Charger Plug, a monthly communication devoted to student news. This was done in collaboration with the Parents' Association. The Human Resources Department, along with the Business office, completed its first year using an on-line payroll/HR system. This was the first year that the faculty and staff, as well as parents, used RenWeb, a database for student information. Capabilities of the software include: parent access to their child’s information and grades; email from staff to parents; creating specific reports using the data; printing of report cards and transcripts by staff; on-line registration by parents to update the student’s information. For the 2009 Summer School, Outreach offered only on-line registration for enrollment.

Shelton’s campus was the host site for CAARTE’s (Center for Advanced ADHD Research, Treatment and Education) presentation of James Swanson, Ph.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Director of Child Development Center, University of California at Irvine’s School of Medicine. His topic was ADHD: A Decade of Science and Current Controversies. The audience was over 1,000 people on April 23, and Dr. Swanson also presented to Shelton staff the next morning during in-service.

Fifty-four seniors graduated, and they were accepted into 174 colleges and universities. Scholarships were offered in the amount of $1,935,090 to 29 seniors, and 24 seniors accepted a total of $863,590. For the second year, Shelton Pride, was distributed during end-of-the-year awards assemblies and graduations. This booklet featured not only seniors but all Shelton students’ many awards, honors, monetary donations to outside organizations, and service hours.


2009 - 2010

The 2009 - 2010 school year began with an enrollment of 848 and ended with 850, with a fluctuation up to 857 in February. Shelton employed 247 people this school year. Mr. Phillip Wiggins continued to be the Board of Trustees’ Chairman.

Dr. Laure Ames assumed directorship of the Shelton Evaluation Center, with Dr. Susan Fleming being named Executive Director Emerita.

The Annual Giving reached $589,258 in donations. The campaign was co-chaired by Lynn and Win Bell and Susan and Evan Griffiths. In October 2009, the school won the EPA Energy Star Award.

The Parents’ Association Co-Presidents were Diane Byrd and Jana Dodson, and David Goldstein was Dads’ Club President. The auction party’s theme was “Mardi Gras Madness” and was held at the Sheraton Dallas. Co-chairs for the second year were Denise Farinholt and Lyn LaMothe. The event netted $296,000. The Parents’ Association’s total amount of gifts to the school for the year was $309,000.

New parents, for the sixth year, were required to attend six parent programs about learning differences and Shelton’s academic programs. The Outreach Center’s new program, modeled after the Shelton Scholars program, continued to offer evening classes for adults who need assistance in reading, writing, and spelling. The Outreach Center continued offering its on-line courses. Three on-line courses are now offered: Dyslexia and Related Disorders, Choices: The Shelton Model for Teaching Social Skills and Values, Shelton System for Organization and Study Skills. All Saturday workshops for MSL therapy level training were delivered by webinar. Plans are underway for offering by webinar the SEE (Sequential English Education) training as well as the Beginning MACAR Course. The Shelton Storefront was launched in February 2010. The Storefront provides an on-line site where people may purchase the manuals and other materials produced by Shelton. The Outreach Center offered training in Multisensory Teaching Approach (MTA) for Keller ISD and training in Take Flight to the school districts of Oxford and Vestavia, Alabama. Presentations by staff during the year were made at American Montessori Society in Boston, MA and Desert Grove, California; at the International Dyslexia Association in Orlando, FL; at the Desert Montessori School in Santa Fe, NM; at the Association of Independent School Librarians in Nashville, TN; at six Dallas area organizations; in Commerce, TX, San Angelo, TX, Lubbock, TX as well as Durham NC and Kansas City, MO.

The Shelton Montessori Elementary and Early Childhood training continued with 14 adult learners enrolled in the Elementary Level and 13 adult learners enrolled in Montessori Teacher Education Center, San Francisco Bay Area’s Early Childhood training that is held on our campus and taught by our staff members. Shelton was pleased to receive approval for affiliation of the Elementary Level course from the American Montessori Society (AMS) and accreditation from the Montessori Accreditation Council for Teacher Education (MACTE) in December 2010. The school is in the accreditation/affiliation process for the Early Childhood course at this time.

In 2009 - 2010 Shelton also hosted approximately 85 individuals or groups in providing observations and information.

In January 2010 Joyce Pickering announced that she would become Executive Director Emerita, effective June 1, 2010. She also announced that effective June 1st, Suzanne Stell (current Head of School) would become the Executive Director. Other changes announced were Linda Kneese (current Outreach Director) would become the Head of School, and that Nancy Coffman (current Associate Director of the Outreach Center) would become Director of Outreach. Marilyn Aaron (current Director of the Speech Clinic) was announced as Director Emerita of the Clinic effective August 1st, with Stephanie Hicks (current Assistant Director) named as Director.

The school hosted the seventh annual Film Festival in April. The ninth Mayfest was held in May 2010.

The Lasso, a cyber-newsletter, was offered again covering Upper School news. The Public Relations Department published its electronic newsletter, The Charger Plug, a monthly communication devoted to student news. This was done in collaboration with the Parents' Association.

The Human Resources Department expanded its Wellness Program for Shelton Employees in the spring 2009. The program was named “Charge into Health.” The staff activities this year included biometric screenings, online courses, incentive challenges, and Pilates classes on campus. Employees who participated pay lower insurance premiums.

There were several sports accolades for students this year. Shelton senior Casey Johnson achieved Girl’s Tennis State Champion for TAPPS for the fourth year. Freshman Nico Agrittelly placed fourth in State Tennis. The Golf Team placed fourth in TAPPS state playoffs. In Track, Shelton had the Girl’s State Champion, freshman Chandler Crumblish.

Forty-four seniors graduated, and they were accepted into 59 colleges and universities. Scholarships were offered in the amount of $520,000 to 12 seniors, and a total of $283,000 was accepted. For the third year, Shelton Pride, was distributed during end-of-the-year awards assemblies and graduations. This booklet featured not only seniors but all Shelton students’ many awards, honors, monetary donations to outside organizations, and service hours.

In June 2010, the Shelton Alumni Board will host the 10th reunion of the class of 2000.


2010 - 2011

The 2010-2011 school year began with an enrollment of 856 and ended with 864, with a fluctuation up to 865 in March/April. Shelton employed 252 people this school year. This was the first year for Mr. Gary Webb to serve as the Board of Trustees’ Chairman.

In June 2010 Joyce Pickering became Executive Director Emerita, after being honored for her 20 years of service. Suzanne Stell assumed the mantel of Executive Director. Other administrator changes in 2010-2011 included: Linda Kneese became the Head of School; Nancy Coffman became Director of Outreach; Marilyn Aaron became Director Emerita of the Speech Clinic effective August 1, 2011; Stephanie Hicks became Director of the Speech Clinic. The Development Office hired Janie Robertson as Manager of Annual Fund and Alumni Relations. In March 2011, George Teague became Shelton’s Athletic Director.

This particular school year marked Shelton’s 35th year anniversary. The theme for the year was “teamwork.” A glass display case on second floor was the focal point for a display of memorabilia of earlier years of Shelton’s history. A video was produced for the auction party in April and for general use.

Shelton School also experienced a lost week of school due to ice storms. The Dallas metroplex experienced 103 hours of below freezing temperatures over four days from Tuesday, February 1st through Friday, February 4th, with sleet/ice and snow of one to five inches occurring Thursday night. On February 9th, the school experienced its fifth weather day with no school. All of the freezing weather led up to a rather frigid Super Bowl at the Cowboy Stadium in Arlington, TX.

The Annual Fund reached its goal of $575,000 with donations of $614,818. The campaign was co-chaired by Susan and Evan Griffiths and Cheryl and Frank Parker. This year there was a fund drive for Dining Hall renovations, including the addition of a commercial kitchen, with commitments of $814,904 by May 2011. The Alumni Association, coordinated through the Development’s office, held a Kick Ball Game on May 21.

After a year-long process of evaluating Shelton's website and how to better market Shelton's many services, we selected Maloney Strategic Communications as the agency to help develop a comprehensive marketing plan. Initial phases were completed toward rebranding Shelton's four business entities: Shelton School, Evaluation Center, Speech Clinic, and Outreach Center. Shelton selected Finalsite as its new content management system, and work was begun on updating all website content.

The Parents’ Association Co-Presidents were Cheri Locke and Jill Giroir, and David Goldstein and Robert Rodriquez were Dads’ Committee Chairmen. Shelton School’s 35th Anniversary Gala and Auction was held at the Frontiers of Flight Museum at Love Field on April 2. Holly Vitullo, Bailey Ann Broughton and Jennifer Clifford were the 2011 Auction Chairs. The event netted $275,000. The Parents’ Association’s total amount of gifts to the school for the year was $385,000.

New parents, for the seventh year, were required to attend six parent programs about learning differences and Shelton’s academic programs. The 2010 Summer School Program had 488 students and Shelton Scholars had 67 students with 75 tutors. Montessori Applied to Children At Risk (MACAR) trained four at the advanced level, 10 at beginning level, and two via webinar. The Outreach Center continued offering its on-line courses. Three on-line courses are now offered: Dyslexia and Related Disorders, Choices: The Shelton Model for Teaching Social Skills and Values, and the Shelton System for Organization and Study Skills. All Saturday workshops for MSL therapy level training were delivered by webinar. Plans are underway for offering by webinar the SEE (Sequential English Education) training as well as the Beginning MACAR Course. The Shelton Storefront, launched in February 2010, provides an on-line site where people may purchase the manuals and other materials produced by Shelton. The Outreach Center offered training in Multisensory Teaching Approach (MTA) for Keller ISD and training in Take Flight to the school districts of Oxford and Vestavia, Alabama. Discussions continued with JW Ray School (DISD) to begin training in the SEE method for the teachers in that school. Final approval from DISD has not yet been achieved. Presentations by staff during the year were made at the Lake Highlands High School, Dallas, TX; Exchange Club, Dallas, TX; the MMA Workshop at Kennebac Montessori School, Damariscotta, Maine; the American Montessori Society Conference, Chicago, IL; the ALTA Conference, Dallas, TX; the Desert Academy, Santa Fe, NM; the Seaton Montessori School, Chicago, IL; and the International Dyslexia Association Conference, Phoenix, AZ. In November 2010, Joyce Pickering made a consultant trip to Benjamin Franklin International School, Barcelona, Spain after the Director of that school visited and toured Shelton. Joyce Pickering will return to the BFIS, Barcelona, Spain to conduct three two-week trainings over the course of the 2011-2012 year.

The Shelton Montessori Elementary and Early Childhood training continued with six adult learners enrolled in the Elementary Level and 11 practicum level adult learners enrolled in Montessori Teacher Education Center, San Francisco Bay Area’s Early Childhood training that is held on our campus and taught by our staff members. The Shelton Montessori Teacher Education Center is in the accreditation/affiliation process for the Early Childhood course at this time and there are 16 adult learners in the inaugural Early Childhood class.

In 2010-2011 Shelton also hosted approximately 109 individuals or groups in providing observations and information. This year Shelton was chosen to be the site of a two-week pediatric rotation for residents with U.T. Southwestern Medical School Children’s Medical Center of Dallas. From October through May we had 25 pediatricians observing all departments of the school.

The year 2010-2011 concluded Shelton’s receiving funding for the Language Intervention (LI) Program, used in the school since 2005.

The school hosted the eighth annual Film Festival in April. The 10th Mayfest was held in May 2011. The Upper School hosted its 13th Ethics Symposium on January 28th.

The Lasso, a student-published cyber-newsletter, was posted again, covering Upper School news. The Public Relations Department published its electronic newsletter, The Charger Plug, a monthly communication devoted to student news. This was done in collaboration with the Parents' Association.

The Human Resources Department continued its Wellness Program, Charge Into Health. Staff activities this year included biometric screenings, online courses, incentive challenges and organized wellness walks. Employees who participated paid lower insurance premiums.

The Athletic Department witnessed many sports accolades for our school teams this year. The school celebrated the achievements with pep rallies, send-offs, administrator sponsored lunches, and tail-gate parties. The Football Team had 2 boys on the 1st Team All District. The Volleyball Team had one on the 1st Team All District and 2 on the 2nd Team. The Boys’ Basketball Team won District and Regional and went to the “Final Four” playoffs. The Girls’ Varsity Basketball had 2 on 1st Team All District and 2 on 2nd Team. The Boys’ Golf Team placed third in Regionals and third in State, with two All State Golfers. The Boys’ Tennis Team placed 1st in District and 3rd in State while two girls qualified for State. The Boys’ Baseball Team went to the Bi-District playoffs. Track had 1 District Champion, 7 Regional Track qualifiers, and 3 State qualifiers. This year was the beginning of several new spirit organizations: the Upper School Mascot (boys or girls, grades 10-11), Upper School Charger Girls Pom / Dance Team (grades 8 - 11), and Upper School Wranglers (boys grades 10 - 11). On May 14th, the football team for 2011-2012 played its Blue and White intra-squad game on the field at Cowboy Stadium.

In late May 2011, the Shelton community was deeply saddened with the death of Andy Krippner, Class of 2010. He was killed in battle in Afghanistan, while serving as a Private in the U.S. Army. For many years Andy wanted to join the U.S. Army and was excited to protect our people and our country. He had just visited with Shelton staff and students earlier this spring while he was on leave. We had included his photo in the April Charger Plug - he attended our basketball rally and led us in The Pledge of Allegiance. That will be a happy memory for those in attendance. Andy was a wonderful young man. He was in our Leadership Hall of Fame, which means he received the Shelton Leadership Award twice. Last May he was honored with The June Shelton Award for his courage, perseverance, and integrity. He had told several staff members about his plans for after his military service. He planned to return to school with the goal of becoming a minister. Both the Honor Ceremony and Graduation for 2011 were dedicated to his memory.

Forty-four seniors graduated and were accepted into 73 colleges and universities. Scholarships were offered in the amount of $1,976,100 to 20 seniors, and a total of $415,000 was accepted. For the fourth year, Shelton Pride, was distributed during end-of-the-year awards assemblies and graduations. This booklet featured not only seniors but all Shelton students’ many awards, honors, monetary donations to outside organizations, and service hours. It is with Shelton pride that we commemorated our 35th anniversary.


2011 - 2012

The 2011 – 2012 school year began with an enrollment of 850 and ended with 872, our largest ever. Shelton employed 248 people this school year. Mr. Gary Webb continued to serve as the Board of Trustees’ Chairman.

The newspaper headlines featured Shelton’s name in early September 2011: “Shelton School beats campus flood to open on time.”

The first floor flood, which occurred on Thursday, July 14, 2011 at approximately 8:30 pm, was caused by an 8” water main break under the foundation of the Lower School Library. The leak was detected, thankfully, by our cleaning staff about 8:30 pm. Before the city could get the water turned off, however, we had ankle-deep water in many areas of the first floor. The areas with the worst damage were the Upper School offices, The Commons, Hillcrest Entrance, Lower School Library, Room 130, Charger Corral, Parents’ Association’s Office, Lower School playground, several stairwells leading out to our parking lots, Middle School and Upper School art rooms, and the hall to the nurse's office area. Many people were here until 3:00 a.m. trying to save books, instruments, clothes in the Corral and PA office, and furniture. There was only a small amount of content loss and the majority of the gym floor was saved by the cleaning crew. Summer School was cancelled the next day (Friday) but the final four days of classes were held beginning on Monday.

Restoration began immediately and proceeded at a rapid pace, with only five weeks until school began. New tile flooring was installed on the first floor and the fountain was taken down, both due to water and structural damage. Much of the downstairs area was a construction zone. Wherever water hit, carpet was replaced.

Because of the flood and subsequent renovations, the Parents’ Orientation was cancelled on August 18. The Lower School and Upper Elementary held their orientation along with the Advisory Open House on Monday, August 22. The Middle and Upper Schools had their orientation in the evening of August 22nd.

Despite major construction happening outside the doors of the Dining Hall, in August 2011 new kitchen construction was finished. SAGE Dining Services, our new vendor, began serving lunch to over 600 parents and students and 240 staff members during the Advisory Open House on Monday, August 22.

The flood damage caused disruption and changes, but other changes to the school occurred for the best. In the summer 2011, Shelton outsourced to a new email hosting service with new spam filtering; the new web site was launched; and all staff were assigned new personal passwords to be used for email and Renweb.

In the Development area, the annual fund campaign, Today for Tomorrow, reached its goal of $600,000 with pledges of $657,653. The campaign was co-chaired by Kathy and Kevin Hanrahan and Michele Valdez and Gary Kennedy.

Travis Terry, the interior designer used in the Dining Hall, created a new design concept for the entryway and Commons area. Part of that new design was a “Wall of Donors” created using donor plaques previously spread throughout the building. All of these plaques were placed on the wall on second floor above The Commons where the Charger horses once stood. The Charger horses were moved to the outside entrance area to Upper School. In addition, the hallways on first and second floor became student art and photography galleries that showcase our students’ talents.

The fund drive for Dining Hall renovations and commercial kitchen had commitments of $876,838.50 by May 2012. A plaque was hung in recognition of the major donation from the Gene and Jerry Jones Family for the Dining Hall and kitchen.

As in any school, staff changes occur. As of June 2011, Mitzi Freeman’s title became Director of Business Operations. Judy Browne left her position as Head of Upper School at the end of 2011-2012, with plans to return next year in a classroom position. Judy has been at Shelton since 1997, when she was recruited to help with the planned creation of our high school. She was at the helm as we added grades 9 - 12, resulting in a Shelton population that has grown from 408 students in 1996-1997 to 870 today. One of the first things that Judy did at Shelton was to create a curriculum in ethics. It is to that field that she will return and devote many of her classroom efforts.

Moving forward, Linda Kneese, Head of School, will act as Interim Head of Upper School for 2012-2013. Administration will use the coming year to design the best plan for Upper School. The Upper School administrative team will remain the same, with the addition of Zac Ladd, a faculty member who has been at Shelton for seven and one-half years. The team will comprise of: Linda Kneese - Head of School/Interim Head of Upper School; Sally Baird - Upper School Assistant Head/Instruction; Dave Hunt - Upper School Assistant Head/Administration; Zac Ladd - Upper School Assistant Head/Activities; and Jenny Cheatham - Upper School Counselor.

Shelton hosted the annual Private School Preview on September 25th. Representatives from 105 independent schools (locals, as well as boarding schools from across the nation) were on hand at the event sponsored by the Independent Schools Admission Association Dallas (ISAAD). The school will host this event for a second time in September 2012, under the direction of Shelton’s Admission Office.

The Parents’ Association Co-Presidents were Tatum Tuthill and Selma Stone. David Goldstein, Dads’ Club Chairman since 2008, stepped down at year-end. Shelton School’s Gala and Auction, “Mystery on the Orient Express,” was held at the Westin Galleria on March 24th. Jenice Dunayer, Courtney Madden, and Judy Wood were the 2012 Auction Co-Chairs, and Honorary Auction Chairs were Tracy and Richard Cheatham. Country western singer Clint Black performed that night for the attendees. The event netted $300,000. The Parents’ Association’s total to the school for the year was $340,000.

The 2011 Summer School Program had 144 classes offered to 539 students in attendance and Shelton Scholars had 73 students with 77 tutors. Upper School offered 10 non-credit courses with 10 for credit, and had 88 Upper School students attending. Montessori Applied to Children At Risk (MACAR) trained 21 at beginning level. The Outreach Center continued offering its on-line courses. Three on-line courses are now offered: Dyslexia and Related Disorders, Choices: The Shelton Model for Teaching Social Skills and Values, and the Shelton System for Organization and Study Skills. Many of the Saturday workshops for MSL therapy level training were delivered by webinar. Plans are underway for offering by webinar the SEE (Sequential English Education) training as well as the Beginning MACAR Course. The Shelton Storefront, launched in February 2010, provides an on-line site where people may purchase the manuals and other materials produced by Shelton. The Outreach Center offered training in Multisensory Teaching Approach (MTA) for Keller ISD. The JW Ray School (DISD) began training in the SEE method for the teachers in that school, in July 2011, in collaboration with the Church of the Incarnation to offer a Scholars Program at Ray. During the summer of 2012 training in SALA (Take Flight) was offered through the Alabama State Department of Education to teachers from across the state. This is the fourth year that Shelton Outreach has provided this training. In August 2011 Shelton hosted the Back to School Montessori Conference on its campus. Presentations by staff during the year were made at the Alabama IDA in Birmingham; Tennessee IDA in Nashville; ALTA Conference, Dallas; the Desert Academy and Desert Montessori, both in Santa Fe, NM; the Seton Montessori School, Chicago, IL; the International Dyslexia Association Conference, Chicago, IL; a Montessori workshop in San Antonio; Colleyville ISD; Barbara Gordon Montessori Colleyville; and the American Montessori Society Annual Conference, San Francisco. Joyce Pickering, Executive Director Emerita and Nancy Coffman, Director of Outreach, made three consultant trips to Benjamin Franklin International School, Barcelona, Spain.

The Shelton Montessori Elementary and Early Childhood training continued with 20 adult learners enrolled in Early Childhood and Elementary Levels and two practicum level adult learners. In May 2012 The Shelton Montessori Teacher Education Center was visited by the OSET team regarding Shelton’s accreditation/affiliation for the Early Childhood course. The OSET team found the Early Childhood Program in compliance in all areas and has submitted that information to the national organizations of MACTE and American Montessori Society. The next steps are the final reviews by MACTE and AMS, an electronic survey of constituents, and vote by each organization. There are 13 adult learners in the inaugural Early Childhood class.

In November 2011 Suzanne Stell and Anne Thomas represented Shelton employees at the Dallas Morning News Top 100 Places to Work awards luncheon. Anyone can nominate a company to be on the list. The DMN invited 1,149 companies to participate for 2011 and surveyed 215 of them, including Shelton. To quote the DMN Business Editor, "We don't choose the winners; the employees do." The top winners are named by company size: small, midsize and large. Shelton was No. 21 in a list of 35 top midsize companies. We consider it a real honor to have been a part of the Top 100!

Shelton was honored as 2011 Business of the Year by the North Dallas Chamber of Commerce, where, as a member, Shelton participates on the Education Committee. This, along with the Top 100 honor, gave all employees a chance to celebrate their place of employment.

Joyce Pickering, Executive Director Emerita, was chosen in March 2012 to be the 2013 American Montessori Living Legacy. This honor was announced at the American Montessori Society’s Annual Conference in San Francisco, CA. Joyce will be honored at many events in the 2012-13 year, culminating in the Keynote Speech and a reception in her honor at the 2013 AMS Annual Conference in Orlando.

In 2011-2012 Shelton also hosted approximately 60 individuals or groups in providing observations and information. For the second year Shelton was the site of a two-week pediatric rotation for residents with U.T. Southwestern Medical School Children’s Medical Center of Dallas. From October through May we had 22 pediatricians observing all departments of the school.

Many of the school’s successful events continue to occur. The Upper School hosted its 14th Ethics Symposium on January 27th with 100 sophomores and juniors from seven area schools attending. The Photography Club hosted a Gallery Reception in the Lenox Gallery in conjunction with one-act plays. The 11th Mayfest was held in May 2012. In 2011-2012, the Upper School course offerings were expanded to include a student choir, The Vocal Charge, which performed several times throughout the year.

The Lasso, a student-published cyber-newsletter, was posted again, covering Upper School news. The Public Relations Department continued to publish the electronic newsletter, The Charger Plug, a monthly communication devoted to student news.

The Human Resources Department continued its Wellness Program, Charge Into Health. Staff activities this year included biometric screenings, online courses, incentive challenges and organized wellness walks. Employees who participated paid lower insurance premiums.

The Athletic Department witnessed many sports accolades for our school teams this year. In January 2012, Coach George Teague was nominated for the Don Shula Coach of the Year Award. The school celebrated the achievements with pep rallies, send-offs, and tail-gate parties. Shelton’s spirit organizations led the students and staff in supporting all teams via the Middle and Upper School cheerleaders, Upper School Mascots (Charlie, Sunny, and Bolt), the Upper School Charger Girls Pom / Dance Team, and Upper School Wranglers.

The Football Team was Bi-District champion and had seven athletes on the 1st Team All District. The Volleyball Team had one on the 1st Team All District and two on the 2nd Team. The Boys’ Basketball Team was Bi-District champion. The Girls’ Varsity Basketball had two on 1st Team All District and two on 2nd Team. The Boys’ Golf Team placed 3rd in District and Regionals and fifth in State, with one All State Golfer. The Boys’ Tennis Team placed 1st in District and 1st in State. The Boys’ Baseball Team went to the Bi-District playoffs. The Boy’s Varsity Track and Field Team placed 8th in State .

Fifty-three seniors graduated and were accepted into 46 colleges and universities. Scholarships in the amount of $936,000 were offered to 11 seniors, and a total of $262,000 was accepted. For the fifth year, Shelton Pride, was distributed during end-of-the-year awards assemblies and graduations. This booklet featured not only seniors but all Shelton students’ many awards, honors, monetary donations to outside organizations, and service hours. The class of 2012 started a tradition wherein the senior class will create a banner to hang during the May awards assemblies. This year’s banner encouraged the senior class and all staff to keep “Charging Forward.”


2012 - 2013

The 2012 – 2013 school year began with an enrollment of 860 and ended with 872. Admissions published the “Shelton Viewbook.” Shelton employed 248 people this school year. Mr. Gary Webb continued to serve as the Board of Trustees’ Chairman.

In the Development area, the annual fund campaign, “Light the Way,” raised gifts of $571,487. The campaign was co-chaired by Joe and Jennifer Clifford and Ellison and Laura Hurt.

Shelton hosted the annual Private School Preview for a second time on September 29th under the direction of Shelton’s Admission Office. Representatives from independent schools (locals, as well as boarding schools from across the nation) and nearly one thousand attendees were on hand at the event sponsored by the Independent Schools Admission Association Dallas (ISAAD).

The Parents’ Association Co-Presidents were Christine Horstman and Dayna Freudenthal. Load that bus! The Parents’ Association hard work paid off. They purchased two new buses for our students. One bus holds 40 students plus a driver while the other holds 33 students plus a driver. Shelton School’s Stampede and Auction was held at The Palladium Ballroom on March 2nd. The 2013 Auction Co-Chairs were Jenice Dunayer, Courtney Madden and Holly Vitullo, all serving for the second year in a row. Honorary Auction Chairs were Karen and Mark Carney. The event netted $249,000. There was a matching gift by the Hoglund Foundation for $25,000.

The 2012 Summer School Program had 152 classes offered to 558 students in attendance and Shelton Scholars had 71 students with 78 tutors. Upper School offered 24 non-credit courses and nine for-credit, with 48 Upper School students attending. Montessori Applied to Children At Risk (MACAR) trained 18 at beginning level, with 9 auditing the course. The Outreach Center continued offering its on-line courses. Three on-line courses are now offered: Dyslexia and Related Disorders, Choices: The Shelton Model for Teaching Social Skills and Values, and the Shelton System for Organization and Study Skills. Many of the Saturday workshops for MSL therapy level training were delivered by webinar. Plans are underway for offering by webinar the SEE (Sequential English Education) training as well as the Beginning MACAR Course. The Shelton Storefront, overseen by Outreach, provides an on-line site where people may purchase the manuals and other materials produced by Shelton. Full accreditation was received for the Early Childhood Montessori Teacher Education Course. The Outreach Center offered training at the Trinity School of Midland for Study Skills, Fluency and Comprehension, and Math; at the Grapevine Faith for Multisensory Techniques for faculty and staff as well as overview of learning differences with simulations; Joyce Pickering presented for LIFT (Literacy Instruction for Texans; continued training for the State of Alabama for the SALA Teaching Training, and the SEE Teaching Level Training for the J. W. Ray School of Dallas. Presentations by staff during the year were made at the International Dyslexia Association conference in Baltimore; ALTA Conference, Dallas; the National Council for Administrator in Special Education (CASE) in Phoenix; and the State of Texas Legislators on behalf of the ALTA Legislative Advisory Council. Joyce Pickering, Executive Director Emerita and Nancy Coffman, Director of Outreach, made consultant trips to Benjamin Franklin International School, Barcelona, Spain.

The Shelton Montessori Elementary and Early Childhood training continued with 11 adult learners enrolled in Early Childhood and Elementary Levels and 18 practicum level adult learners.

As announced in 2011-2012 at the American Montessori Society’s Annual Conference in San Francisco, CA., Joyce Pickering, Executive Director Emerita, was chosen as the 2013 American Montessori Living Legacy. Joyce was honored at many events in the 2012-13 year, culminating in the Keynote Speech and a reception in her honor at the 2013 AMS Annual Conference in Orlando, in April 2013.

Shelton’s Research efforts began with a two-year study “Reducing Effects of ADHD and Learning Differences with Exercise.” The research will conduct a randomized control trial using aerobic exercise as a non-medication intervention for children with ADHD and/or Learning Differences. The targeted population is intended for Shelton high school students diagnosed with either ADHD or LD or both. The investigators include: Joyce S. Pickering, Hum.D.; Carroll W. Hughes, Ph.D.; Jennifer Davis, B.A.; Steve McBride, M.S.; Jeff Wigley, B.S.

For the third year Shelton was the site of a two-week pediatric rotation for residents with U.T. Southwestern Medical School Children’s Medical Center of Dallas. From October through May we had 14 pediatricians observing departments of the school.

Shelton is a repeater! Shelton was thrilled to be honored for the second consecutive year as a Top 100 Best Places to Work in the metroplex. Out of 276 companies to undergo the survey, Shelton was 16 out of 35 in the small company (150-499 employees) category. There were 72,385 replies that determined this year’s rankings. More importantly, Shelton employees’ responses made it possible to receive Best at Making Work Meaningful. We have a real sense of Shelton Pride in receiving these accolades, because our entire staff made it happen.

Many of the school’s successful events continued to occur. The 12th Mayfest was held in May 10, 2013. With the laptop program continuing to be successful, it was enhanced with iPads for teachers to be used for classroom enrichment for 5th-12th grade students.

New happenings at Shelton in 2012-2013 were abundant. In the fall 2012, ten seniors, as charter members, were inducted into the National Honor Society. In February 2013 an additional group of 12 sophomores, 10 juniors, and four seniors were inducted into the Shelton Chapter. Edmodo, the system adopted as the communication tool for homework for Middle School and Upper School, began to be used. A group, Think Tank, was formed that comprised of a cross section of staff with the mission of bringing ideas to a round table discussion with the premise of continuous improvement for student learning at the forefront. The Think Tank met several times during the year, and reported to the staff. The Speech Clinic opened one day a month by appointment to the community for vision/hearing/speech-language screenings. For the Upper School Program, Linda Kneese, current Head of School, was the Interim Head of Upper School. There was the introduction of Writing Labs for freshmen and sophomores to enhance writing skills for those identified with more significant writing difficulties. There was the consolidation of four ethic courses into three with new course titles: Ethics I to Ethics; Ethics II and III combined to Sociology; and Ethics IV to Psychology. The Upper School advisories changed from multi-grade to single grade. Additional Upper School course offerings were expanded to include college writing, post World War II History, and Honors classes.

The Lasso, a student-published cyber-newsletter, was posted again, covering Upper School news. The Public Relations Department continued to publish the electronic newsletter, The Charger Plug, a monthly communication devoted to student news.

The Human Resources Department remained focused on the health of staff. The Wellness Program, Charge Into Health, was offered again. Staff activities this year included biometric screenings, online courses, incentive challenges and organized wellness walks. Employees who participated paid lower insurance premiums. After 20 years, Shelton once again sponsored a Shelton Charger 5K and 1-mile Fun Run. This run was aimed at staff, student, and parent participation but also welcomed the community. Staff member, Kelly Hall, was the chairman of the race event. The Wellness Committee members were involved in the race’s planning and success.

The school created a Safety and Security Committee; the committee is comprised of staff from all areas of the school. There is to be a safety audit by Bill Keslar of Building Solutions.

The Athletic teams moved up to TAPPS 4A and continued to compete at a high level. The school celebrated the achievements with pep rallies, send-offs, and tail-gate parties. The Middle and Upper School cheerleaders, Upper School Mascots (Sunny and Bolt), the Upper School Charger Girls Dance Team, Upper School Wranglers, and a new Drum-Line were instrumental in leading the students and staff in supporting all teams. The student athletic trainers were introduced this year in a pilot program. For the State Cross Country meet in the fall, it was the first time to compete as a male and female team and not just individuals. In golf, a female athlete qualified for State competition and placed eighth. In tennis, a female athlete qualified for the TAPPS State Tennis Tournament. Track had many accomplishments this year. There were records broken in 13 events. There were two male district champions in three events and two female athletes who were runner-up in two events in district. There were also two male runner-up athletes in three events at regionals. Three athletes qualified for the TAPPS State Track and Field Meet and two student athletes were awarded TAPPS Academic All-State.

Sixty-three seniors graduated and were accepted into 125 colleges and universities. Scholarships in the amount of $4,686,100 were offered to 29 seniors, and a total of $1,064,000 was accepted. Shelton Pride, (divisions’ fund raising activities for organizations outside of Shelton) was incorporated into the divisions’ programs of end-of-the-year awards assemblies and graduations.


2013 - 2014

The 2013 - 2014 school year began with an enrollment of 854 and ended with 881. Shelton employed 246 people this school year. Mr. Gary Webb continued to serve as the Board of Trustees’ Chairman.

Shelton’s 10-year on-site campus visit for its re-accreditation was conducted September 29 through October 2, 2013, by its accrediting organization, the Independent Schools Association of the Southwest (ISAS). The visit by an 18-member team was preceded by months of preparations and staff committee meetings in order to submit our Self-Study and the Documentation of Adherence to Standards. On March 31, 2014, ISAS notified the school by letter of its achieving re-accreditation.

In the Development area, the annual fund campaign, “Now is the Time,” raised gifts of $617,230. The “Assuring the Future” Endowment Plaque was installed July 2013 on the first floor entry wall. The Shelton Golf Tournament, as a fund-raiser, was held at the Cowboys Golf Course, September 17, 2013.

In the fall of 2013 Glen Brown became the Chief Financial Officer. This new position was part of the succession plan as Dr. Robert Pickering planned his retirement in May 2014 after 24 years of loyal service. In March 2014 Diana Liese joined the Business Office in the newly created position of Controller.

The Human Resources Department remained focused on the health of staff. The Wellness Program, Charge Into Health, was continued. Staff activities this year included free biometric screenings, online courses, incentive challenges and organized wellness walks. Employees who participated paid lower insurance premiums. New policies were announced during August staff in-service for Social Media and Integrity Reporting. For the third year in a row, Shelton was voted as a Top 100 Best Places to Work in 2013 by the Dallas Morning News. Shelton was the recipient of Number 24 among the top 35 mid-size companies in the metroplex.

Community involvement and public relations efforts included Shelton’s 5K Run to Read event in October, leadership in The Big Picture: Rethinking event with eight organizations, participation in the local Commit educational project, and continued participation in the North Dallas Chamber of Commerce’s Education Committee.

School

During the August in-service technology department announced that 2013 model MacBooks Airs would be distributed to 670 staff and students in grades 7th – 12th. Changes in technology forthcoming would be upgrades in phone service, a new internet service, and internal network.

For the first time, three Upper School students represented Shelton at the Quiz Bowl competition at St. Mark’s School of Texas. This competition has two teams of four players face off to answer academic-centered questions for points. Shelton placed ninth out of 14 teams.

The school’s favorite events occurred, including the August Advisory Open House; Awards Assemblies throughout the year; and fall Open House. The second Library Literary Festival and dinner was held January 28, 2014. Four authors participated: John Clendening, Ellen Hopkins, Bryan Mark Rigg, and Harry Harrelson, Jr. This year the Upper School Ethics Symposium was cancelled due to bad weather. The 13th Mayfest was held in May 9, 2014. The second annual Hunger Games event was held May 16, 2014, for eighth graders and high school students. All grades participated in food donations to the North Texas Food Bank.

Shelton had 27 entries in the Texas Library Media Awards for photos, videos, animation, and websites (glogs). Shelton has participated in this event for many years.

In January Shelton began, for the first time ever, a sponsorship of a student teacher for the spring semester. Beth Goodall, a senior from Abilene Christian University, was granted an exception to ACU’s student teaching protocol for placement at Shelton. Her assignments included Upper Elementary and Lower School.

The Lasso, a student-published cyber-newsletter, was posted again, covering Upper School news. The Public Relations Department continued to publish the electronic newsletter, The Charger Plug, an on-line communication devoted to student news.

The school celebrated athletic events and achievements with pep rallies and tail-gate parties. The Middle and Upper School cheerleaders, Upper School Mascots (Sunny and Bolt), the Upper School Charger Girls Dance Team, Upper School Wranglers, and Drum-Line were instrumental in leading the students and staff in supporting all teams.

In football, we had one athlete who made 1st team all-district and district newcomer of the year. In cross country, we had one male athlete who finished 6th in state. In basketball, we had one male athlete who made 1st team all-district.

In baseball, we had one athlete who made 1st team all-district. In golf, for a second year in a row, a female athlete placed 5th in Regional and qualified for State competition and placed 12th. In girls’ doubles in tennis, one team qualified for the TAPPS State Tennis Tournament. In boys’ single tennis, two players placed 5th and 6th in the District. In boys’ double tennis, one team placed 6th in District. In Track & Field, there was a male athlete who was district and regional champion in the high jump and 110m hurdles and was also state champion in the high jump and runner up in state in the 110m hurdles. This athlete also broke the school record for high jump (6’4”), long jump (22’1”), 110m hurdles (14.95) and 100m (10.97). Another male athlete was district and regional champion in the 800m, 3rd in state in the 800m and 2nd in district in the 1600m and 300m hurdles. This athlete also broke the school record for the 300m hurdles (42.73), 800m (1:56.79) and 1600m (4:30.92). Numerous other school records were also broken for the Track & Field team this year.

In February, the Chargerettes won awards in Technique, Choreography, High Point, Super Sweepstakes, and Best in Class (for our size) at the Marching Auxiliaries Competition at Liberty High School in Frisco. In May, a celebration was held to honor four athletes who will continue to play sports at the college level.

In August 2013, Shelton hired Krystal Cunningham as its first Athletic Training Coordinator. This coordinator was the overseer for the new Athletic Training Program. The students in this program covered the training aspects for all of our high school sports, as well as had the opportunity to visit other athletic training programs for the Mavericks, Cowboys and SMU Mustangs.

In December 2013, the off campus Sports Enhancement Center (SEC) was opened. This facility has 4000 square feet and contains a weight room, training room and coaches office.

In February Shelton’s National Honor Society inducted 16 sophomores and juniors. In 2014 sixty-five seniors graduated and were accepted into 135 colleges and universities. Scholarships in the amount of $2.2 million were offered to 27 seniors, and a total of $625,500 was accepted. Banner quote for class of 2014 was Dream Big and Dare to Fail by Norman Vaughan. Valedictorian was Daniel Kussman; salutatorian was Mikey Halperin.

For the fourth year Shelton was the site of a three-day pediatric rotation for residents with U.T. Southwestern Medical School Children’s Medical Center of Dallas. From October through May we had 18 pediatricians observing Lower School, Upper Elementary, Middle School, in-house Speech Program, and Evaluation Center.

Parents’ Association

The Parents’ Association Co-Presidents were Christine Horstman and Annette Matteson. The association sponsored the Sky Ranch Child/Father Weekend in October; the Book Fair with Dads’ Luncheon in October; the very popular Grandparents’ Day in November; and staff appreciations luncheons during parent conferences in October and February. Shelton School’s Stampede and Auction was held again at The Palladium Ballroom on February 22, 2014, with Steve Holy as the entertainer. The 2014 Auction Co-Chairs were Rachel Dreiling and Heather Cronister. The Parents’ Association donated $280,000 to the Shelton School from their fund-raising efforts in 2013-14.

Outreach

The 2013 Summer School Program had 149 classes offered to 607 students in attendance. Upper School offered 21 non-credit courses and eight for-credit, with 100 Upper School students attending. Shelton Scholars had 109 students over the summer, fall and spring semesters.

Montessori Applied to Children At Risk (MACAR) trained 46 participants at Shelton and 47 at two different locations in Seattle, Washington and Princeton, New Jersey. Four Montessori credit courses were offered by Dallas Baptist University in June 2013 on our campus. The Shelton Storefront, overseen by Outreach, continues to provide an on-line site where people may purchase the manuals and other materials produced by Shelton. In 2013-2014, approximately $50,000 of materials was purchased.

The Outreach Center continued training for the State of Alabama, Oxford, Mississippi, and the cities of Grapevine/Colleyville in SALA Teaching Training, and Scholars Training for the J. W. Ray School of Dallas. Presentations by staff during the year were made at the International Dyslexia Association conference in New Orleans; Montessori Leaders Collaborative and MACTE/IAME seminar in Alexandria, Virginia; and American Montessori Society in New York City. Joyce Pickering travelled to Beijing, China to present on Montessori Applied to Children at Risk and to consult with government officials about standards of Montessori training. Additional workshops/training occurred in Midland, TX; Argyle, TX; Plano, TX; Hope, AR; Milwaukee, WI; Greensboro, NC; and Jersey City, NJ.

The Shelton Montessori Elementary and Early Childhood Training, which is AMS affiliated and MACTE accredited, had 29 learners (9 from Shelton). The Multisensory Structured Language (MSL) Training, which is IMSLEC accredited, had 98 teachers for SALA and SARA and in SEE, 57 participants. Outreach’s short-term workshops (MSL, LD, Montessori) had 1,197 attendees. In November 2013, due to the increased training done with both the MTA (Multisensory Teaching Approach) materials and the Take Flight materials from Texas Scottish Rite Hospital, Outreach moved the Take Flight based courses from SALA (Shelton Academic Language Approach) to the Shelton Adolescent Reading Approach (SARA) and changed that title to “Shelton Academic Reading Approach” (still SARA). This more accurately reflects the training that we are doing. Chris Bedenbaugh will continue as course director for SALA and teach MTA. Nancy Coffman will continue as course director for SARA (Shelton Academic Reading Approach) and teach the Take Flight courses. This change was approved at the IMSLEC council meeting in New Orleans.

On March 27, 2014, Shelton hosted 108 American Montessori Society Dallas conference attendees (2 groups). The visitors toured classrooms, the Speech Clinic, Evaluation Center and Outreach Center. Some participated in the Simulations of Learning Differences during their visit. At the AMS/Dallas conference, an entire track was devoted to Montessori Applied to Children at Risk, and seven staff members assisted: Amy Kelton, Casey Barnett, Sue Cantrell, Joyce Pickering, Laure Ames, Stephanie Hicks, and Pauline Novak. The Upper Elementary and Lower School children performed at the conference opening under the direction of Zilei Leite, music teacher.

Research

Shelton’s research efforts continued its two-year study “Reducing Effects of ADHD and Learning Differences with Exercise” from August through May in three health classes. The research conducted a randomized control trial using aerobic exercise as a non-medication intervention for children with ADHD and/or Learning Differences. The targeted population is intended for Shelton high school students diagnosed with either ADHD or LD or both. In 2013-2014 the Hope Exercise Study had 49 student participants. The investigators include Joyce S. Pickering, Hum.D. and Carroll W. Hughes, Ph.D. Steve McBride, M.S., is the course instructor. In January 2014 the Discovery Foundation awarded $46,000 to this HOPE research project for a second year.

Speech Clinic

The Speech Clinic had a busy year providing services to clients. There were 281 community clients seen and 264 clients seen at other private schools, at home or via Skype. The Clinic also performed speech/language, hearing and vision screenings at 18 schools, including Shelton School.

In March 2014 the Continuing Education Board (CEB) of the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) approved the Shelton Speech Clinic as an ASHA Approved Continuing Education (CE) provider. ASHA Approved CE Providers are the only organizations approved to offer continuing education courses for audiologists and speech-language pathologists for ASHA Continuing Education Units (CEUs). The application process was rigorous. Shelton joins 532 other organizations across the country and around the world that have had their organizational process and courses reviewed to ensure the highest possible standards.

Shelton Evaluation Center

The Evaluation Center provided testing services for 254 clients between June 1, 2013 through May 31, 2014. Not only does the Evaluation Center see Dallas metroplex clients, but also those from 11 other cities in Texas. Clients have traveled from London, Switzerland, Costa Rica, Florida, Arizona, Alaska, Washington, North Carolina, Indiana, Missouri, New Mexico, Massachusetts, Arkansas, Tennessee, and Louisiana.


2014 - 2015

The 2014 - 2015 school year began with an enrollment of 866 and ended with 887. Shelton employed 243 people this school year. Mr. Gary Webb continued to serve as the Board of Trustees’ Chairman.

In the Development area, the annual fund campaign, “Together We Can…Make a Difference,” raised gifts of $685,000. The Shelton Golf Tournament, as a fund-raiser, was again held at the Cowboys Golf Course, September 2, 2014.

Public / Community Relations highlights for 2014-2015 included:

  • Production of I Am Shelton video featuring Shelton staff
  • Sponsorship with other ISAS schools of 1) Common Ground Speaker Series featuring Madeline Levine, Ph.D; 2) presentation of How Did We Get So Afraid for Our Kids by Lenore Skenazy; and 3) letter and video combating teen alcohol / drug abuse
  • Communication weekly via ePost to Parents
  • Participation in Shelton-wide 10-year marketing plan led by board member Ken Luce
  • Leadership role with Independent Schools Communicators Council
  • Coordination of keynote speaker / panelists for Shelton’s 15th Annual Ethics Symposium
  • Ongoing representation with N. Dallas Chamber of Commerce’s Education Committee
  • Ongoing collaboration with community entities, including Park Cities Learning Differences Association, Commit!, neighborhood homeowners associations
  • Increased promotion of all Shelton programs via FaceBook, Twitter, online blogs

Human Resources highlights were:

  • Employment of 243 employees for Shelton’s four business entities
  • Continuation of Charge Into Health Wellness Program with annual campus health fair and free biometric screenings, online courses, incentive challenges via wellness walks and activities, recognition of wellness champions
  • Implementation of new paid leave donation policy
  • Communication weekly via Staff Stuff

School

The school’s favorite events occurred, including the August Advisory Open House; Awards Assemblies throughout the year; and fall Open House. This year the Upper School Ethics Symposium was held February 6, 2015. The 14th Mayfest was held May 10, 2015. The third annual Hunger Games event was also held May 10, highlighted by the Staff/Faculty Team playing kickball against the Middle School Team, with MS winning 5-3. All grades participated in food donations to the North Texas Food Bank as part of the cause.

Shelton had 35 Middle and Upper School student entries in the Texas Media Awards for photos, videos, animation, and websites (glogs). Shelton has participated in this event for many years.

Twenty seventh- and eighth-grade artists were featured in the Dallas Museum of Art's Art Ball 50: Self Portrait exhibit in the spring 2015. Each student chose either an imitational, expressive or symbolic style for his or her work. The Young Arts Program (YAP) is the DMA's most extensive and ambitious PreK-12 studio-based educational program. Shelton was one of 12 schools invited to participate in the event. The Bob Bennett Best of Show Award was awarded to a Shelton student.

The Lasso, a student-published cyber-newsletter, was posted again, featuring Upper School news. The Public Relations Department continued to publish the electronic newsletter, The Charger Plug, an on-line communication devoted to student news.

Staff and students responded to the Commit! 2 Dallas call to action with initiative. They made a difference in improving the educational methods and bettering the lives of the students and families of William Cabell Elementary Dallas through the Commit! 2 Dallas Program. Donations included school supplies, school equipment, training in Shelton programs, meals, and clothing. Shelton was humbled and proud to stand with Cabell in the charge to change, help, and better the community. Cabell Elementary nominated Shelton School for recognition as a Non-Profit Partner / Volunteer of the Year Award. Shelton was a finalist for this award.

The school celebrated athletic events and achievements with pep rallies and tail-gate parties. The Middle and Upper School cheerleaders, Upper School mascots (Sunny, Bolt and Charlie), the Upper School Chargerettes Dance Team, Upper School Wrangler and Drum-Line were instrumental in leading the students and staff in supporting all teams.

In football, Shelton had two athletes who made 2nd team all-district. In cross country, one male athlete finished 9th in state. For fall sports, two athletes made TAPPS academic all-state.

In basketball, one male athlete and one female athlete made 2nd team all-district. In soccer, two male athletes made 2nd team all-district and one female athlete made district newcomer of the year. For winter sports, one athlete made TAPPS academic all-state.

In baseball, two athletes made 2nd team all-district. In golf, for a third year in a row, a female athlete qualified for State competition. This year two females qualified for State competition. The boy’s team was a regional qualifier. One male athlete qualified for State competition. In women’s track and field, Shelton had two district champions in the discus and pole vault as well as one regional champion in the 400m. Shelton also had three women state qualifiers in the discus, pole vault and 400m. In men’s track and field, one male athlete who was district champion in the long jump and also was a state qualifier in the long jump, high jump, triple jump and 110m hurdles. Another male athlete was district champion in the 800m and 1600m and state qualifier in those two events. One other male athlete was a state qualifier in the triple jump. Twelve school records were broken this year for the men’s and women’s track and field teams. For spring sports, we had four athletes who made TAPPS academic all-state.

At camp, the cheerleaders received the National Cheerleaders Association (NCA) Spirit Award for the first time ever. One cheerleader and one mascot received NCA Top All-American awards. Two other cheerleaders received NCA All-American awards and six other cheerleaders were NCA All-American nominees.

In May, a celebration was held to honor two athletes who will continue to play sports at the college level.

USA Football named George Teague to its Advisory Committee. USA Football is the sport's national governing body, leading the game's development for youth, high school and other amateur football players. It also is the sport's leader in coaching education and player skill advancement. Coach Teague was also elected to the Athletic Executive Committee of Texas Private and Parochial Schools (TAPPS). He will represent Dallas / Fort Worth's 4A Division.

The Chargerettes drill team had a great day March 21, 2015 at the American Dance and Drill Team (ADTS) national dance competition, which took place at the University of North Texas in Denton. Teams from high schools and colleges performed, some from as far away as China. Shelton's team earned National Champion status for their Novelty routine and Officer Lyrical routine. They brought home the trophy for 2nd Runner Up Team in their division of seven teams. This was only the second season for the Chargerettes to participate in competitions, and to achieve this ranking at a national competition was quite an accomplishment.

In March Shelton’s National Honor Society inducted four seniors and 19 sophomores. In 2015, 51 seniors graduated and were accepted into 57 colleges and universities. Scholarships in the amount of $2,072,400 million were offered to 30 seniors, and a total of $695,000 was accepted. Valedictorian was Brandon Douglas; salutatorian was Joseph Wales.

For the fifth year Shelton was the site of a three-day pediatric rotation for residents with U.T. Southwestern Medical School Children’s Medical Center of Dallas. From October through May we had seven pediatricians observing Lower School and Upper Elementary.

Parents’ Association

The Parents’ Association Co-Presidents were Annette Matteson and Lynne Turner. The association sponsored the New Parent Dinner, Division Breakfasts, Dads’ Group Dinner, Sky Ranch Child/Father Weekend in October, the Book Fair with Dads’ Luncheon in October, the very popular Grandparents’ Day in November, and staff appreciations luncheons during parent conferences in October and February. Shelton School’s Stampede Auction was held at Shelton February 21, 2015. Auction Co-Chairs were Mickie Bragalone, Courtney Dios, and Karen Higgins. The Parents’ Association donated $385,000 to Shelton School from their fund-raising efforts in 2014-2015.

Outreach

The 2014 Summer School Program had 138 classes offered to 618 students in attendance. Upper School offered 23 non-credit courses and eight for-credit, with 98 Upper School students attending. Shelton Scholars had approximately 70 students during the summer, fall and spring semesters.

Montessori Applied to Children At Risk (MACAR) trained 34 Beginning participants and four Advanced at Shelton and eight in Seattle, Washington. Seven Montessori credit courses were offered by Dallas Baptist University in the summer of 2014 on Shelton’s campus. Six language therapy courses were offered by Dallas Baptist University on Shelton’s campus. For the third year, MACAR courses were offered at the American Montessori Society Annual Conference, with 300 attending the various presentations.

The Shelton Storefront, overseen by Outreach, continues to provide an on-line site where people may purchase the manuals and other materials produced by Shelton. In 2014-2015, approximately $160,264 of materials and training were purchased on the website.

The Specific On-Site Evaluation Team (SOSET) from the International Multisensory Language Education Council (IMSLEC) visited from June 16-18, 2014 for the reaccreditation of Shelton School’s Multisensory Structured Language (MSL) course, Sequential English Education (SEE). Shelton received IMSLEC’s reaccreditation for SEE for seven years, through the year 2021.

The Outreach Center continued training for the State of Alabama, Oxford, MS, and the cities of Grapevine/Colleyville in SARA Teaching Training, and Scholars Training for the J. W. Ray School of Dallas. Presentations by staff during the year were made at the International Dyslexia Association conference in San Diego, CA; Montessori Leaders Collaborative and MACTE/IAME seminar in Alexandria, VA; and American Montessori Society in New York City. Joyce Pickering travelled to Beijing, China to present on Montessori Applied to Children at Risk and to consult with government officials about standards of Montessori training. Additional presentations were given in Barcelona, Spain; Boston, MA; Austin, TX; Anchorage, AK; Alexandria, VA; Seattle, WA; Tokyo, Japan; Barksdale Air Force Base, Bossier City LA; Tyler, TX; Sarasota, FL; San Diego, CA; Chicago, IL; Michigan, South Carolina, and Canada. Workshops/training occurred in Midland, TX; Argle, TX; Plano, TX; Hope, AR; Jonesboro, AR; Monticello, AR; Milwaukee, WI; Greensboro, NC; and Jersey City, NJ.

The Shelton Montessori Elementary and Early Childhood Training, which is AMS- affiliated and MACTE-accredited, had nine participants from Shelton in 2014. The Multisensory Structured Language (MSL) Training, which is IMSLEC- and IDA-accredited, had 37 teachers for Shelton Academic Language Approach (SALA) and Shelton Adolescent Reading Approach (SARA) and in Sequential English Education (SEE), 13 participants. From June to August 2014, the total workshops and training participants numbered 341. Outreach’s short-term workshops (MSLE, LD, Montessori) had approximately 3,150 attendees. Chris Bedenbaugh continued as course director for SALA and taught MTA. Nancy Coffman continued as course director for SARA and taught the Take Flight courses. Joyce Pickering and Amy Kelton co-direct the SEE training courses. Pauline Novak and Joyce Pickering co-directed the Montessori training courses.

Research

Shelton’s research efforts continued its two-year study “Reducing Effects of ADHD and Learning Differences with Exercise” from August through May in three health classes. The research conducted a randomized control trial using aerobic exercise as a non-medication intervention for children with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) and/or Learning Differences (LD). The targeted population is intended for Shelton high school students diagnosed with either ADHD or LD or both. All four cohorts of the Hope Exercise Study were completed in the fall 2014. Data for 196 student participants was collected. The investigators included Joyce S. Pickering, Hum.D. and Carroll W. Hughes, Ph.D. Steve McBride, M.S., was the course instructor. Stephanie Weatherford assisted for the study. The study’s Final Report of February 2015 stated: “The study has contributed to the strong need for non-medication alternatives for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and enhancing educational achievement for children and adolescents with different types of learning disabilities/differences (LD). Recent research suggests that aerobic exercise may be a potential treatment based on the increased release Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) and brain neurotransmitters that accompanies vigorous exercise.”

Speech Clinic

The Speech Clinic had a busy year providing services to clients. There were averages per month of 61 Shelton students in the Clinic; 32 community clients; and 40 clients seen at other private schools, at home or via Skype. The Clinic also performed speech/language, hearing and vision screenings at 13 schools, including Shelton School. The Director, Stephanie Hicks, resigned at the end of July 2015, due to her family’s move to Arkansas. Krista Norwood assumed the position of Director.

Shelton Speech Clinic is among 532 other organizations across the country and around the world that have had their organizational process and courses reviewed to ensure the highest possible standards. As an American Speech Hearing Association (ASHA) Approved CE Provider, Shelton is able to offer continuing education courses (CEUs) for audiologists and speech-language pathologists for ASHA.

Shelton Evaluation Center

The Evaluation Center provided testing services for 268 clients between June 1, 2014 through May 31, 2015. The Evaluation Center saw clients from the Dallas/Ft. Worth metroplex, and clients from eight other cities in Texas were also seen. This year, out-of-state clients traveled from Dubai, California, Illinois, Louisiana, Missouri, and New Mexico.


2015 - 2016

The many successes of 2015 - 2016 would not have been possible without the parents of our incredible students. As we ended our 40th anniversary year, two words -- THANK YOU -- seem so small when trying to convey the School’s gratitude. The 40th anniversary year was a success!

We cannot begin to list the many things that made this such a special year; but a sample list includes:

  • Tail gate parties that added to our athletics festivities
  • Staff Appreciation events that made us feel so very special
  • Grade-level parties that drew in new friends
  • Food trucks that fed us with good times
  • Volunteers who served soup and grilled sandwiches
  • Ambassadors who stuffed envelopes and generated good will
  • Dads who spent a special weekend at Sky Ranch with their children
  • Library volunteers who coordinated books, bagels and an outstanding book fair
  • Volunteers who put on a party for some 1,000 proud grandparents
  • Parents who sold spirit items and used uniforms
  • Wall display of t-shirts to show Shelton’s Pride through the years
  • A display wall of photographs from 1976 to present
  • 40th Anniversary t-shirts worn with the school uniform

The 2015 - 2016 school year began with an enrollment of 895 and ended with 919. Mr. Gary Webb continued to serve as the Board of Trustees’ Chairman.

In Development, the Annual Giving campaign surpassed the goal, bringing us almost $800,000; additional gifts of $338,000 brought the total to some $1.1 million.

Public / Community Relations

The highlight of the year was promoting the excitement of Shelton’s 40th anniversary. Our theme was Forward at Forty, and every major event incorporated it throughout the year. The PR Department produced the video 40 Reasons to Celebrate 40 Years at Shelton. It featured employees, students, alumni, parents, board members and neighbors, including City Council member Sandy Greyson. It was premiered at in-service in August and posted on Shelton’s website for the remainder of the year.

Advertising for the year included a 40th anniversary logo, as did banners throughout the campus. Special spots were produced for the media, including KERA 90.1. Print pieces captured some forty benchmarks in Shelton’s history. The campus lobby featured photos from Shelton’s four decades.

A Founders’ Day reception was held September 16 for former and current board, administration, major donors, and parent and alumni representatives.

The annual Horizon newsletter engaged readers with 40th anniversary Q&A, as did the regular ePost to Parents, Staff Stuff and other e-news publications.
The 2016 auction sponsored by the Shelton Parents’ Association used Looking Back / Charging Forward as its theme. The PR Department produced the Stampede auction video for the festive occasion.

Other major activities included a collaborative rebranding initiative led by board member Ken Luce. Our logo was revised to include four stars representing the four entities of Shelton: School, Speech Therapy Program, Evaluation Center, and Outreach / Training. Our tagline was revised to read Engage, Enrich, Empower.

Shelton had a strong presence at the International Dyslexia Association’s annual conference in October, this year held in Dallas. We had conference presenters, student entertainers, a booth, and visitors on our campus.

Shelton alumnus John “Scoot” McNairy visited Shelton in the fall. The successful actor / producer acknowledged Shelton for its educational program and encouraged students through his presentations to Think differently.

Other great events that showcased Shelton were Dallas Child’s Summer Camp Fair, which drew 1,042 attendees to campus; Shelton’s 15th Annual Ethics Symposium, with 6 schools in attendance and notable professionals as guest panelists; and EdRev in April, a day co-sponsored by Shelton to celebrate the gifts and talents of students with learning differences.

Human Resources

Shelton had 244 employees for the year – 232 were full time, and 12 were part time.

In the fall, employees were given 40th anniversary T-shirts to wear throughout the year.

Our Wellness Program initiatives continued with an annual health fair, the Maintain, Don’t Gain Program, several wellness activities, and recognition of employee wellness champions. Shelton was identified as a top tier client by Compass Professional Health Services based on our partnership and exceptional utilization.

Shelton added the benefit of employer-sponsored short term disability for its full time employees.

Employees supported major campus wide community service initiatives, notably a partnership with the Commit! Program, in which we partnered with Dallas ISD’s Cabell Elementary.

Shelton recognized its employees at the annual year-end Staff Appreciation Luncheon. Retiring employees were thanked for their service, and others received longevity bonuses.

School

The school’s favorite events occurred, including the August Advisory Open House; Awards Assemblies throughout the year; and fall Open House, spirit days, and homecoming events. This year the Upper School Ethics Symposium was held February 6, 2015. The 15th Mayfest was held May 13, 2016. The fourth annual Hunger Games event was also held May 13, highlighted by the Staff/Faculty Team playing kickball against the Middle School Team. All grades participated in food donations to the North Texas Food Bank as part of the cause.

For the first year, the school used the Raptor Visitor Management System at the security desk to scan government issued ID for all visiting parents and visitors. In addition, this year the Nurse’s office had two full-time nurses on duty. The technology department had a Technology Committee composed of staff from all divisions. There was as an outside consultant looking at technology in Shelton who worked one-to-one with students. The spring 2016-2017 re-enrollment and new registration process was completed entirely on-line.

Shelton’s Upper Elementary, Middle and Upper Schools submitted 45 photos, videos, animation, graphic design, and website entries to the state-wide Texas Media Awards, sponsored by the Texas Library Association. Shelton has participated in this event for many years.

The staff and students involved in the Visual Arts Department had a productive year.

  • 20 Middle School artists participated in the International Dyslexia Association’s “Youth Art Gallery” at the conference at the Gaylord Texan in October.
  • M.S. Art instructor, Sherry Houpt represented Shelton at the invitational art exhibit “Artist as Teacher/Teacher As Artist” at the Episcopal School of Dallas in the fall. The exhibit featured professional artists who teach in private schools in the Dallas/Ft. Worth region.
  • 25 artists from all divisions were invited to display their work at the GlobeRunner Gallery in Addison, Texas in February.
  • The sixth grade art class was selected to participate in a new “SKYPE” program sponsored by the Nasher Sculpture Center in February. Mrs. Houpt, who serves on the Teacher Advisory Board of the Nasher, collaborated with Lynda Wilbur, from the Education Department in a virtual tour of the museum.
  • 25 Middle School artists created artwork and entered the C.A.R.E. (Chemical Awareness Resources and Education) calendar competition. There were six winning entries from Shelton, out of a field of 700. The students had artwork displayed at Northpark Center, and 3 entries will be included in the 2016-2017 calendar.
  • The International Dyslexia Association journal, “Perspectives” featured the award winning art of Maddy Pollak (8th grade) on the cover of the summer publication.

In March, Music Movement, a non-profit foundation, presented the Shelton music department with a donation for $5,000. Music Movement supports music programs for students with learning differences and special needs across the United States. Shelton parent Julia Pitlik serves on the board of Music Movement. The check was presented at their first annual benefit concert at the Anatole Hotel.

The Lasso, a student-published cyber-newsletter, was posted again, featuring Upper School news.

The Public Relations Department continued to publish the electronic newsletter, The Charger Plug, an on-line communication devoted to student news.

Staff and students again responded to the Commit! 2 Dallas call to action with initiative. They continued to make a difference in improving the educational methods and bettering the lives of the students and families of William Cabell Elementary, Dallas ISD. Donations included school supplies, school equipment, training in Shelton programs, meals, and clothing. Shelton was humbled and proud to stand with Cabell in the charge to change, help, and better the community.

In February Shelton’s National Honor Society inducted 24 sophomores. In May, we sent 61 seniors to their new adventures. They have been accepted into 229 colleges and universities, and they have received $4,352,110 in merit scholarships. Their theme has been The best way to predict your future is to create it. Valedictorian was Dylan Frankl; salutatorian was Christian Cole.

For the sixth year Shelton was the site of a two-day pediatric rotation for residents with U.T. Southwestern Medical School Children’s Medical Center of Dallas. From October through May we had 12 pediatricians observing Lower School and Upper Elementary.

The athletics department celebrated many achievements in all sports. This is because of the continued growth and hard work of both the players and coaches.

In football, we had two athletes who made 1st team all-district, two athletes who made 2nd team all-district, one athlete who made first team all-state and one athlete who made second team all-state. In cross country, we had one male athlete who finished as state champion. In volleyball, we had one athlete who made first team all-district. For fall sports, we had three athletes who made TAPPS Academic All-State.

In girl’s basketball, we had one athlete who made 1st team all-district and two athletes who made 2nd team all-district. In boys basketball, we had one athlete who made 2nd team all-district. In soccer, we had one male athlete who made 1st team all-district. For winter sports, we had two athletes who made TAPPS Academic All-State.

In baseball, we had an athlete who received offensive player of the year and 1st team all-district and one athlete who made 2nd team all-district. In golf, we had a male athlete qualify for state competition. The boy’s team was also a regional qualifier. In tennis, we had one female athlete qualify for state. In women’s track and field, we had a women’s district and regionals champion as well as 2nd in state for the pole vault. In men’s track and field, we had an athlete who was district, regional and state champion in the 800m as well as district champion and qualifier for state in the 400m. The men’s 4x400m relay was runner up in district and qualified for state. Another athlete was district runner up in the 3200m. Seven school records were broken this year for the men’s and women’s track and field teams. For spring sports, we had four athletes who made TAPPS Academic All-State.

Our Varsity Cheerleaders were well represented at summer camp. One cheerleader received the NCA All-American award and the NCA Camp Star Jumper award. Two other cheerleaders received NCA Camp Star Tumbler awards.

The Chargerettes dance team participated at the American Dance and Drill Team (ADTS) national dance competition and for the first time, attended the TAPPS State Championship in Waco. In the ADTS competition, the team received the Sweepstakes Award, Gussie Nell Davis Award, Runner-up for Best in Class for their division and other honors. In the TAPPS State Championship, they won 10th in state. Additionally, they had one team member who received 2nd Team All-State and another team member who received Honorable Mention All-State.

In May, a celebration was held to honor three athletes who will continue to play sports at the college level.

Speech Clinic
The Speech Clinic had a busy year providing services to clients. Seven licensed and certified speech-language pathologists completed an average of 740 therapy sessions each month with over 150 clients from both Shelton and the community. Individual and group therapy to improve Social Language Skills was provided for Shelton and community clients, as well. In addition to Shelton, therapists provided therapy services off-site in 11 private schools in the Dallas area. Speech, language, hearing, vision and reading screenings were completed with over 1,000 students at 13 schools.

Shelton Speech Clinic is among 532 other organizations across the country and around the world that have had their organizational process and courses reviewed to ensure the highest possible standards. As an American Speech Hearing Association (ASHA) Approved CE Provider, Shelton may offer continuing education courses (CEUs) for audiologists and speech-language pathologists for ASHA.

Shelton Evaluation Center
The Evaluation Center provided testing services for 250 clients from June 1, 2015 through May 31, 2016. The Evaluation Center saw clients from the Dallas/Ft. Worth metroplex and clients from ten other Texas cities. This year, out-of-state clients traveled from New Mexico, Oklahoma, California, Arkansas, Louisiana, Colorado, and Indiana.

Parents’ Association
The Parents’ Association President was Mickie Bragalone. The association sponsored the New Parent Dinner, Division Breakfasts, Dads’ Group Dinner, Sky Ranch Child/Father Weekend in October, the Book Fair with Dads’ Luncheon in October, the very popular Grandparents’ Day in November, tailgating at games, food trucks, and staff appreciation luncheons during parent conferences in October and February. Shelton Parents' Association, through their many efforts this school year, raised just over $1 million dollars for the school!

The Parents’ Association auction party was a stupendous success this year. The theme was “Looking Back---Charging Forward” celebrating Shelton’s 40-year anniversary. Chaired by Jennifer Dix and Andrea Nayfa, the sold-out auction party raised $876,000. The Honorary Auction Chairs were Gene and Jerry Jones and Charlotte and Shy Anderson. The highlights of the evening included the performance of Don Henley and his band as well as a video from Jerry Jones explaining what Shelton means to his family. Charlotte and Shy Anderson also spoke on behalf of Shelton.

Additional fund raising activities included the Boosterthon of $46,800; the Charger Corral raised $23,600; and the parents gave to the teachers and staff $55,000 through Holiday Happiness.

In 2015-2016 the Parents’ Association presented the first Shelton Parents’ Association Recognition Kudos (SPARK) financial award to one faculty member of each division and one staff member. The first year’s recipients were Carla Ratcliff, Lower; Penny Bigbie, Upper Elementary; Gwen Jensen, Middle, and Becky Rivers, Upper. The staff member was Anne Thomas, Public Relations/Human Resources. This award will be given each May.

Outreach

Summer School
The 2015 Summer School Program had 162 classes offered to 620 students in attendance. Upper School offered 16 non-credit courses and eight for-credit courses, with 103 Upper School students attending.

Shelton Scholars
Shelton Scholars
had 82 students during the summer, fall and spring semesters. In the fall of 2014, the Scholars program transitioned from a one-on-one tutoring program into a small group (two-three students per tutor) program. Since the introduction of group tutoring, the Scholars program has seen an overall increase in testing scores and has been able to provide higher quality tutors for the students.

Ongoing On-Site Training

Sequential English Education (SEE)
Joyce Pickering continued as course director along with Shelton SEE Instructors Amy Kelton, Danyle Duke, Liz Gonzalez and Tina Graves.

The SEE Teaching Level summer class of 2015 trained 13 teachers. Thirteen were certified at the SEE Teaching Level (One Shelton teacher and twelve teachers from other schools). The SEE Therapy Level class trained two teachers. (One Shelton teacher was certified at the SEE Therapy Level and three from other schools). At the SEE Teaching Instructor Level three Shelton teachers were certified. At the SEE Instructor Therapy Level/QI three Shelton teachers and two teachers from other schools were certified.

Shelton Academic Language Approach (SALA)
Chris Bedenbaugh continued as course director for SALA and took five Keller ISD teachers to the Therapy Level.

The Specific On-Site Evaluation Team (SOSET) from the International Multisensory Language Education Council (IMSLEC) visited from May 14-16, 2016 for the reaccreditation of Shelton School’s Multisensory Structured Language (MSL) course, Shelton Academic Language Approach (SALA). Shelton received IMSLEC’s reaccreditation for SALA for seven years, through the year 2023.

Shelton Academic Reading Approach (SARA)
Nancy Coffman continued as course director for SARA. G-g Shryer continued as the summer introductory instructor. One introductory course and one course for CALTs in utilizing the Take Flight curriculum were conducted by G-g in the summer. Nancy taught an advanced course during the summer and an additional introductory course during the school year.

Therapy Level
All three courses, SEE, SALA and SARA merged for the therapy level seminars that were taught by a variety of instructors from the Shelton staff as well as speakers from the outside. Dr. Laure Ames continued to teach the required one-week course at the therapy level titled “Diagnosing Learning Different Children: Referral and Testing.”

On-going Off-site Teacher Training In Multisensory Language Education

Sequential English Education (SEE)
Two teachers from Mata Elementary School were trained in the teaching level of SEE. Shelton instructors continue to train and observe teachers from other schools from Tyler, Allen and Dallas, Texas, California, Alaska, New Mexico and Arkansas.

Joyce Pickering presented SEE teaching level segments at all of her MACAR and Montessori trainings.

SALA
Chris Bedenbaugh taught the Teaching Level of the MTA curriculum to eight Keller ISD teachers.

SARA
Nancy Coffman delivered SARA courses in Fayetteville, Jonesboro, Monticello, Crowley’s Ridge, Farmington, Arkansas, as well as in Birmingham and Montgomery, Alabama. Chris Bedenbaugh delivered SALA (MTA) training to teachers from Keller, Texas ISD. G-g Shryer delivered SARA courses at Shelton School.

Short Term Workshop
As part of the International Dyslexia Association’s (IDA’s) National Conference, a visit to Shelton School was offered and hosted by Joyce Pickering, John Hodges, and Pauline Novak. It was lead by 10 tour guides and included classroom observations and an Overview of Learning Differences presentation. Tours were also conducted twice in October to Key School of Fort Worth. Linda Kneese, and Nancy Coffman coordinated the visits.

Joyce Pickering hosted visitors from the Shanghai Montessori Education Academy in April, administrators from New Mexico in September, a group from Penfield Montessori Academy in Wisconsin in January and teachers from Fort Worth Montessori and Colorado in February. Joyce hosted a group of upcoming teacher candidates from DBU in April with a tour and a presentation on Learning Differences.

Amy Kelton presented to Montessori groups in August, October and November in New Mexico, Massachusetts and Canada.

The Outreach Center presented 40 workshops from June of 2015 through May of 2016. Joyce Pickering, Nancy Coffman, John Hodges, Amy Kelton, Chris Bedenbaugh, and Pauline Novak were presenters.

Training/Conferences
Nancy Coffman presented to the Alabama Branch of IDA; Mobile Bay branch of the Alabama IDA; Dallas Branch of the International Dyslexia Association’s annual conference; Keller ISD and at the Arkansas Dyslexia conference; Washington, DC branch of IDA; and IDA workshop held in Nova Scotia, Canada.

Joyce Pickering presented at the ALTA Chapters Austin Branch Conference, and Montessori groups in New Mexico, New York and Pennsylvania. Joyce also presented at the Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network in Harrisburg, PA. Joyce Pickering, Amy Kelton, Blair King, Laure Ames, and Nancy Coffman presented workshops at the IDA’s National Conference in Grapevine, Texas. Joyce Pickering traveled to Qingdao, China with a group of delegates from the American Montessori Society (AMS) to attend the Chinese Society of Education Conference. They convened to announce the Chinese standards for Montessori Education. Joyce and Pauline Novak traveled to Washington DC for Montessori Accreditation Council for Teacher Education (MACTE) meetings. At this meeting Joyce was awarded the Wisdom of the Elders Award. The AMS Annual Conference in Chicago had presentations from Joyce Pickering, Amy Kelton and Laure Ames. Dr. Robert Pickering was awarded the AMS Lifetime Achievement Award at the conference. Joyce traveled to Amsterdam, Netherlands to represent AMS at the annual AMI conference, extending the trip with a tour of the Duhovka Montessori Schools in Prague, Czech Republic.

Montessori Applied to Children At Risk (MACAR)
MACAR training in Dallas 2015 again saw the benefits of offering the course at the Annual Conference the previous year in Philadelphia with 40 trainees. Six were Shelton employees, three were from Shelton Montessori Training; 13 were from the AMS Annual Conference. Joyce Pickering, Amy Kelton, Sue Cantrell and Casey Barnett shared their knowledge, strategies and skills with Montessori teachers from around the country, to help children who learn differently.

Joyce, Amy and Pauline Novak also offered MACAR off-campus in Boston with 24 participants. Joyce Pickering has begun work to present the MACAR course online through Dallas Baptist University in Dallas.

Montessori Early Childhood
Joyce Pickering and Pauline Novak offered Montessori training to new teachers in the Dallas ISD, Garland ISD, Fort Worth ISD and multiple private schools in Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston, College Station, Austin and Amarillo. Fourteen teachers received their Early Childhood Certificate this year. Peggy Krug, Joni Harris, Sue Cantrell, Cathy Luby, Joyce Pickering, Donna Gonzalez, Christine Davis and Laura Monroe instructed the 12 courses within this training.

Montessori Elementary
Joyce Pickering and Pauline Novak offered Montessori training to new teachers in Dallas ISD, Garland ISD, Austin ISD, and multiple private schools in Dallas, Fort Worth and Arkansas. Eleven teachers received their Elementary I Montessori Certificate this year. Instructors included Sue Cantrell, Peggy Krug, Joyce Pickering, Judi Bauerlein, Matty Umscheid, Rachel Nordgren, Laura Monroe, and Amy Kelton

The Shelton Storefront, overseen by Outreach, continues to provide an on-line site where the manuals and other materials produced by Shelton may be purchased. In 2015-2016, approximately $156,027.00 of materials and training were purchased on the website.

Research
In 2015 and 2016, Shelton students in seventh grade through seniors in high school participated in a research project developed in collaboration between Shelton School and Joe Powers from Stanford University. This project was developed with the hopes of improving the ways that scientific findings about the brain are communicated to students in this age group and to learn how students’ beliefs about subject material like brain science and school culture can contribute to improved learning and well-being in school.


2016 - 2017

The 2016 – 2017 school year began with an enrollment of 906 and ended with 935. Mr. Gary Webb continued to serve as the Board of Trustees’ Chairman.

In DEVELOPMENT, the Annual Giving campaign surpassed the goal, bringing us $886,944; additional gifts of $154,911 brought the total to $1,041,855.

PUBLIC RELATIONS & MARKETING

A major emphasis for the year was Shelton’s website redesign via FinalSite, Shelton’s website host and provider of its content management system. An internal redesign team did major planning, along with input from a larger Shelton stakeholders team. The launch of the new website went live mid-December 2016.

PR managed year-round communication to constituents through its main channels of Staff Stuff (every Monday) and ePost to Parents (every Wednesday).

PR collaborated with and supported Shelton leadership in ongoing promotion of its new campus pursuit and quiet phase of its associated capital campaign. This included communication with all Shelton constituents, architects, local homeowners’ associations (HOAs) and other officials involved with planning and zoning initiatives.

Advertising of all Shelton programs continued through traditional media, with an increase in use of social media, especially Shelton’s FaceBook page and Twitter account.

PR assisted with communication to support major Texas legislative endeavors in support of dyslexia education funding. This involved board, parents and employees. Other efforts included materials and sponsorship at a Dyslexia Awareness Day in Austin, TX.

Shelton opened its doors to numerous like-minded organizations to promote outreach and education concerning learning differences, e.g. hosting the local International Dyslexia Organization’s (IDA) Dallas Dyslexia Information Group (DDIG). Shelton also promoted its many resources at conferences, including the local Academic Language Therapy Association (ALTA) and Dallas Branch, IDA. Shelton was a corporate sponsor of the local StandUpLD event in Frisco, which celebrates the gifts and talents of those with learning differences.

Anne Thomas, Director of Public Relations and Marketing, continued to chair the local Independent Schools Communicators Council, which now comprises 25 schools. She also participated in Public Relation Society of America’s (Dallas Chapter) mentor program and sponsored Katie Mudd as a mentee.

Shelton continued its membership with the North Dallas Chamber of Commerce and was an active participant with its Education Committee. Shelton representatives attended the Chamber’s annual luncheon event, which featured Shelton board member Charlotte Anderson as keynote speaker.

Shelton PR produced Epic Journeys Begin at Shelton, a video that was premiered at the Stampede auction. Those filmed included Shelton students, parents and members of a special group of Shelton alumni called the Sweet 16.

Shelton promoted joint ventures with other ISAS schools, including the annual Common Ground Speakers Series, this year featuring Dr. Shimi Kang.

PR staff continued as liaisons with Shelton’s Parents’ Association (SPA) for all its communication purposes, including the weekly Scoop, promotion of the annual Stampede auction and numerous other events throughout the year that require tickets or online ordering.

PR produced its annual Horizon print newsletter and promotional pieces for the Evaluation Center, Speech Language Therapy Program, and Outreach / Training.

PR secured 12 panelists for its 17th annual Ethics Symposium, always a special activity for Upper School. This year’s event drew students from seven schools. PR also featured Shelton’s Leaders for Life program launched this school year.

PR promoted Shelton’s many community service activities, including collaboration with the non-profit Café Momentum, an annual blood drive with Carter BloodCare, club activities, the Commit! project with Cabell Elementary (Dallas ISD), and numerous student council projects, to name but a few. These projects go hand in hand with Shelton’s culture of sharing.

PR and Marketing was proud to support Shelton’s four entities with their respective goals and marketing initiatives and the entire Shelton organization’s central mission and messages.

HUMAN RESOURCES

Shelton had 252 employees for the year – 239 were full time, and 13 were part time.

Our Wellness Program initiatives continued with an annual health fair, the Maintain, Don’t Gain Program, several wellness activities, and recognition of employee wellness champions.

Shelton recognized its employees at the annual year-end Staff Appreciation Luncheon. Retiring employees were thanked for their service, and others received longevity bonuses.

SCHOOL

The school’s favorite events occurred, including the August Advisory Open House, Awards Assemblies throughout the year, fall Open House, spirit days, and homecoming events. This year the Upper School Ethics Symposium was held February 22, 2017. The 16th Mayfest was held May 12, 2017. The fifth annual Hunger Games event was also held May 12, highlighted by a powderpuff football game led by the juniors and seniors.

Shelton again this year paid for the parents to have the parent directory app via its Renweb program. The directory was also available for $5.00 by printing a paper copy from on-line. Additionally in 2016-2017 for the teachers, Renweb One eliminated the need for Parallels program. The spring 2017-2018 re-enrollment and new registration process was completed entirely on-line.

The Upper Elementary division announced the retirement of Head, Letah Samuelson, in 2017-18. The new Head will be Amy Kelton, assisted by Christine Davis and Will Riemer.

The staff and students involved in the Visual Arts Department had a productive year.

  • This year, Shelton’s Middle and Upper School students submitted 37 black and white, color photos, videos, and graphic design entries to the state-wide "Texas Youth Creators Awards” sponsored by the Texas Library Association. Eighth grade student Slayton Pierson won the "Best of Show" with her color photograph titled "Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder.” Shelton has participated in this event for many years.
  • 18 Gallery Days, student art display and reports presented to parents in Studio 7, the Middle School art room.
  • 60 students had work matted and framed to hang in the halls throughout the year.
  • 12 Middle School and fifth grade students had artwork featured in the Grandparents’ Day slide show.
  • 25 art students from all divisions exhibited their work and had a reception at the GlobeRunner gallery space in Addison, Texas.
  • 32 Middle School and fifth grade students participated in a poster competition in conjunction with Better Speech and Hearing Month. This was a collaborative project headed by Sherry Houpt and Rachel Stock.
  • Two Middle School students, Maria Fleming and John Gibson, had their work featured on the cover of the International Dyslexia Association Journal, in the summer and fall editions.
  • Middle School art instructor Sherry Houpt served her seventh year on the Nasher Teacher Advisory Board, for the Nasher Sculpture Center, bringing innovative ideas and current art educational practices to the Shelton art classroom.
  • The Lasso, a student-published cyber-newsletter, was posted again, featuring Upper School news.

    Staff and students again responded to the Commit! 2 Dallas call to action with initiative. They continued to make a difference in improving the educational methods and bettering the lives of the students and families of William Cabell Elementary, Dallas ISD. Donations included gently used uniforms, training in Shelton programs, meals, and man-power moving materials and organizing classrooms. Shelton was humbled and proud to stand with Cabell in the charge to change, help, and better the community.

    In March, Shelton’s National Honor Society inducted 25 students. In May, we sent 67 seniors into their next chapter. They have been accepted into 103 colleges and universities, and they have received $4,521,869 in merit scholarships. The seniors’ banner quote was What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within. (Ralph Waldo Emerson). Valedictorian was Harper McKenzie; salutatorian was Jonathan Rodrigue.

    For the seventh year Shelton was the site of a pediatric rotation for residents with The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School Children’s Medical Center of Dallas. From September through May we had 25 pediatricians observing Lower School and Upper Elementary.

    The athletics department once again celebrated many achievements in all sports. This is due to the continued growth and hard work of both the players and coaches during the summer and throughout the year.

    In football, we had 12 athletes who made 1st Team All-District, six athletes who made 2nd Team All-District, four athletes who made Honorable Mention All-District, one athlete who was Offensive Player of the Year in the district, one athlete who was Defensive Player of the Year in the district, two athletes who made Second Team All-State, and two athletes who made Honorable Mention All-State. The Varsity Football team finished second in district and qualified for the playoffs. One football player was selected to participate in the Blue-Grey All-American Bowl and AT&T Stadium. The homecoming game was played on September 23, 2016 at “The Star” at the Ford Center in Frisco.

    In cross country, we had one male athlete who finished 10th in state. In volleyball, we had two athletes who made Second Team All-District and two athletes who made Honorable Mention All-District. For fall sports, we had six athletes who made TAPPS Academic All-State.

    In girl’s basketball, we had two athletes who made 1st Team All-District, two who made 2nd Team All-District and three who made Honorable Mention All-District. The assistant coach was named Assistant Coach of the Year in the district. In boys basketball, we had one athlete who made 1st Team All-District, one who made 2nd Team All-District and two who made Honorable Mention All-District.

    In soccer, we had one male athlete who made 1st Team All-District and two who made Honorable Mention All-District. In the inaugural year for the varsity swim team, we had two athletes who made 1st Team All-Region in two events, one relay that made 1st Team All-Region, one athlete who made 2nd Team All-Region in two events, one relay that made Honorable Mention All-Region, one athlete who made 2nd Team All-State in two events, one who made 2nd Team All-State in one event, and one who made Honorable Mention All-State in one event. In all, there were 12 athletes who were state qualifiers. For winter sports, we had eight athletes who made TAPPS Academic All-State.

    In baseball, we had an athlete who received Offensive Player of the Year, one who received Freshman of the Year and one who received Most Valuable Player in the district. We had five athletes who made 1st Team All-District, three who made 2nd Team All-District, one who made Honorable Mention All-District, one who made 1st Team All-State and one who made 2nd Team All-State. The team was Co-District Champion and qualified for the playoffs. In golf, we had one male athlete who was district champion, two male athletes who were regional qualifiers and one athlete qualified for state competition. In tennis, we had one men’s doubles team that made Honorable Mention All-District and a State Qualifier. We also had one men’s singles that made Honorable Mention All-District, 3rd in State and were Honorable Mention All-State. In men’s track and field, we had three athletes who were the District Champion in High Jump, 400m and the 3200m. We also had a Pole Vault Champion in District and Regionals, along with being Runner-Up in State. An athlete finished 2nd in State in the High Jump and then there were three other State Qualifiers. In women’s track and field, we had a Pole Vault champion in District and Regionals, along with being Runner-Up in State. We also had a State Qualifier in the High Jump. Five school records were broken this year for the men’s and women’s track and field teams. For spring sports, we had five athletes who made TAPPS Academic All-State.

    Our Varsity Cheerleaders received the Excellence and Best Technique Awards at NCA Camp over the summer.

    The Chargerettes dance team participated at the TAPPS State Dance Competition and placed 4th in State. Two Chargerettes were named 1st Team All-State and one Chargerette was named 2nd Team All-State. The Chargerettes Dance team was chosen to compete at Disney World over spring break.

    We had six students who participated in the Student Athletic Trainer program this year. In May, a celebration was held to honor three athletes who will continue to play sports at the college level.

    Athletics Director George Teague left Shelton in January 2017. Freddie Jones was named interim Athletics Director. He led the department for the remainder of the school year. Mr. Jones was later named Athletics Director/Physical Education/Football Coach and Aasha Marietta was name Assistant Athletic Director.

    PARENTS’ ASSOCIATION

    The Parents’ Association Co-Presidents were Holly Vitullo and Bailey Ann Broughton. The association continued to sponsor the New Parent Dinner, Division Breakfasts, Dads’ Group Dinner, Sky Ranch Child/Father Weekend in October, the Book Fair with Dads’ Luncheon in October, Boosterthon activities, the very popular Grandparents’ Day in November, tailgating at games, food trucks, and staff appreciation luncheons during parent conferences in October, February and May. Shelton Parents' Association, through their many efforts this school year, raised $300,000 for the school!

    The Parents’ Association auction party on April 8, 2017 was once again a success. The theme was Epic Journeys Begin at Shelton. Chaired by Stephanie Hardeman and Leti Lackey, the sold-out auction party at The Bomb Factory raised $350,000. The evening’s performance was by Voyage, the world’s #1 Journey Tribute Band.

    Additional fund raising activities included net proceeds of $40,000 from the Boosterthon. The parents gave $60,000 to the faculty and staff through Holiday Happiness.

    At the end-of-the-year staff luncheon, the Parents’ Association presented the second Shelton Parents’ Association Recognition Kudos (SPARK) financial award to one faculty member of each division and one staff member. The second year’s recipients were Bonita Smith, Lower; Will Riemer, Upper Elementary; Claire Duesing, Middle; and Julie Niederer, Upper. The staff member was Anne’ Hughes.

    SPEECH LANGUAGE HEARING PROGRAM

    The Speech Program had a busy year providing services to clients. Seven licensed and certified speech-language pathologists completed an average of 740 therapy sessions each month with over 150 clients from both Shelton and the community. Individual and group therapy to improve Social Language Skills was provided for Shelton and community clients, as well. In addition to Shelton, therapists provided therapy services off-site in 11 private schools in the Dallas area. Speech, language, hearing, vision and reading screenings were completed with over 1,000 students at 13 schools.

    Shelton Speech Program is among 532 other organizations across the country and around the world that have had their organizational process and courses reviewed to ensure the highest possible standards. As an American Speech Hearing Association (ASHA) Approved CE Provider, Shelton may offer continuing education courses (CEUs) for audiologists and speech-language pathologists for ASHA.

    SHELTON EVALUATION CENTER

    The Evaluation Center provided testing services for approximately 250 clients between June 1, 2016 and May 31, 2017. The Evaluation Center saw clients from the Dallas/Ft. Worth metroplex and clients from ten other cities in Texas. This year, out-of-state clients traveled from Alabama, California, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Washington. We also saw clients from Malaysia and Canada.

    OUTREACH

    Chris Bedenbaugh joined the Outreach team, splitting her time between the Middle School and Outreach.

    The Shelton Storefront, overseen by Outreach, continued to provide an on-line site where the manuals and other materials produced by Shelton may be purchased.

    Summer School

    Patricia Gallaher continued to direct the Summer School Program. The 2016 Summer School Program had classes offered to 625 students in attendance. Upper School offered 17 non-credit courses and eight for-credit courses.

    Shelton Scholars

    Shelton Scholars had 84 students during the summer, fall and spring semesters. The Scholars program is still utilizing a small group tutoring structure (two to three students per tutor). Since the introduction of group tutoring in 2014, the Scholars program continues to see an overall increase in testing scores and has been able to provide higher quality tutors for the students.

    Ongoing On-Site Training:

    Sequential English Education (SEE)

    Joyce Pickering continued as course director along with Shelton SEE Instructors Amy Kelton, Danyle Duke, Liz Gonzalez and Tina Graves. The SEE Teaching Level summer and fall classes of 2016 trained 26 teachers. Sixteen were certified at the SEE Teaching Level (nine Shelton teachers and seven teachers from other schools). The SEE Therapy Level summer class trained five teachers. (Two Shelton teachers were certified at the SEE Therapy level and two from other schools).

    Shelton Academic Language Approach (SALA)

    Chris Bedenbaugh continued as course director for SALA and took eight Keller ISD teachers to the Therapy Level.

    Shelton Academic Reading Approach (SARA)

    Nancy Coffman continued as course director for SARA. G-g Shryer continued as a summer introductory instructor. One introductory course and one course for CALTs in utilizing the Take Flight curriculum were conducted by G-g and Nancy in the summer. Nancy taught an advanced course during the summer and two additional introductory courses during the school year.

    Therapy Level

    All three courses, SEE, SALA and SARA merged for the therapy level seminars that were taught by a variety of instructors from the Shelton staff as well as speakers from the outside. Dr. Laure Ames continued to teach the required one-week course at the therapy level titled “Diagnosing Learning Different Children: Referral and Testing.”

    On-going Off-site Teacher Training In Multisensory Language Education:

    SALA

    Chris Bedenbaugh taught the Teaching Level of the MTA curriculum to ten Keller ISD teachers.

    SARA

    Nancy Coffman delivered SARA courses in Fayetteville, Jonesboro, Monticello, Crowley’s Ridge, Farmington, Arkansas, in Birmingham and Montgomery, Alabama; and in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Chris Bedenbaugh delivered SALA (MTA) training to teachers from Keller, Texas ISD. G-g Shryer delivered SARA courses at Shelton School.

    Sequential English Education (SEE)

    Three teachers from Bridgemark School in Tyler, Texas, three teachers from Mata Elementary in DISD, one teacher from Kenai Peninsula Borough ISD Soldona, Alaska, two teachers from LIFT in Dallas, were trained in the teaching level of SEE. Shelton instructors continue to train and observe teachers from other Tyler schools, and Dallas, Louisiana, California, Alaska, New Mexico and Arkansas.

    Joyce Pickering presented SEE teaching level segments at all of her Montessori Applied to Children At Risk (MACAR) and Montessori trainings.

    Short Term Workshop

    The Outreach Center presented 44 workshops from June of 2016 through May of 2017. Joyce Pickering, Nancy Coffman, John Hodges, Amy Kelton, Chris Bedenbaugh, G-g Shryer, Laure Ames and Pauline Novak were presenters.

    Joyce Pickering hosted visitors from Sao Paulo, Brazil, Chattanooga, Tennessee and Austin, Texas. Joyce hosted a group of upcoming teacher candidates from Dallas Baptist University in April with a tour and a presentation on Learning Differences.

    Amy Kelton presented to Montessori groups in Texas, Massachusetts and Canada.

    Training/Conferences

    Nancy Coffman presented to the Arkansas Dyslexia conference, and to the Oceola and Valley View school districts in Arkansas.

    Joyce Pickering presented at the ALTA National Conference in Austin, and to Montessori groups in Bermuda, New York, Maine, Connecticut and throughout Texas. Joyce also presented at the Montessori Asia Conference in Hong Kong. Joyce and Pauline Novak traveled to Washington DC for Montessori Accreditation Council for Teacher Education (MACTE) meetings. The American Montessori Society (AMS) Annual Conference in San Diego had presentations from Joyce Pickering, Laure Ames, Amy Kelton, Peggy Krug, Joni Harris and Pauline Novak. Also at the conference Joyce was recognized for completing her tenure as President of the Board of Directors of AMS.

    Montessori Applied to Children At Risk (MACAR)

    MACAR 2016 training in Dallas had 22 trainees. Four were Shelton employees, nine were from Shelton Montessori Training, and five were in Advanced MACAR. Joyce Pickering, Amy Kelton, Sue Cantrell and Casey Barnett shared their knowledge, strategies and skills with Montessori teachers from around the country, to help children who learn differently.

    Joyce and Pauline Novak also offered MACAR off-campus in McLean Virginia with 15 trainees, Milwaukee, Wisconsin with 19 trainees and White Rock Montessori in Dallas with 25 trainees.

    Montessori Early Childhood

    Joyce Pickering and Pauline Novak offered Montessori training to new teachers in the Dallas ISD, Garland ISD, Fort Worth ISD and multiple private schools in Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston, College Station, Austin and Amarillo. Fourteen teachers received their Early Childhood Certificate this year. Peggy Krug, Joni Harris, Sue Cantrell, Cathy Luby, Joyce Pickering, Donna Gonzalez, Christine Davis and Laura Monroe instructed the 12 courses within this training.

    Montessori Elementary

    Joyce Pickering and Pauline Novak offered Montessori training to new teachers in Dallas ISD, Garland ISD, Austin ISD, and multiple private schools in Dallas, Fort Worth and Arkansas. Eleven teachers received their Elementary I Montessori Certificate this year. Instructors included Sue Cantrell, Peggy Krug, Joyce Pickering, Judi Bauerlein, Matty Umscheid, Rachel Nordgren, Laura Monroe, and Amy Kelton.

    Shelton Montessori Training

    • An intensive summer training began at the beginning of June 2016.
    • Montessori Early Childhood (EC) June – July
    • 10 EC classes - 23 Adult Trainees
    • participated
    • 6 Shelton Instructors
    • 13 EC Graduates earned an AMS Certificate
    • Montessori Elementary I (EI) June – July
    • 15 EI classes - 57 Adult Trainees participated
    • 6 Shelton Instructors - 4 Non-Shelton Instructors
    • 14 EI Graduates earned an AMS Certificate
    • Montessori Elementary II (EII) June – July
    • 10 EII classes - 12 Adult Trainees participated
    • 2 Non-Shelton Instructors